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Full text of "Albert Gleizes, 1881-1953 : a retrospective exhibition"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Library and Archives 



http://www.archive.org/details/albertgleizes1881robb 






ALBERT GLEIZES 
1881 • 1953 

A RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION 

BY 
DANIEL ROBBINS 



THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK 

IN COLLABORATION WITH 

M USEE NATIONAL D'ART MODERNE. PARIS 

MUSEUM AM OSTWALL DORTMUND 



PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS 



SAX FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 



CITY ART MUSEUM OF ST. LOUIS 



KRANNERT ART MUSEUM, COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, CHAMPAIGN 

THE COLUMBUS GALLERY OF FINE ARTS 

THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA. OTTAWA 

ALBRIGHT-KNOX GALLERY, BUFFALO 

THE ARTS CLUB OF CHICAGO 



Published by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, 1964 All Rights Reserved by the Author and Publisher 
Library of Congress Card Catalogue Number: 64-25186 Printed in The Netherlands 



THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION 



TRUSTEES 



HARRY F. GUGGENHEIM. PRESIDENT 



ALBERT E. THIELE. VICE PRESIDENT 



H. H. ARNASON, VICE PRESIDENT. ART ADMINISTRATION 



ELEANOR. COUNTESS CASTLE STEWART 



DANA DRAPER 



PETER O. LAWSON-JOHNSTON 



A. CHAOTCEY NEWLIN 



MRS. HENRY OBRE 



DANIEL CATTON RICH 



MICHAEL F. WETTACH 



MEDLEY G. B. WHELPLEY 



CAUL ZIGROSSER 



It is appropriate that this first major exhibition of the 
works of Albert Gleizes should be an international and 
collaborative venture among three nations indisputably 
linked with the painter. First and foremost, Gleizes is a 
French artist, a founder of Cubism and an influence on 
the School of Paris. He was also a member of Der Sturm, 
and his many theoretical writings were originally most 
appreciated in Germany, where especially at the Bauhaus 
his ideas were given sympathetic consideration. Finally, 
he spent four crucial years in New York, and played an 
important role in making America aware of modern art. 
His key paintings, long since scattered far and wide 
across the globe, are, at last, brought together in this 
retrospective evaluation of his life work. 



Jean Cassou, Conservateur en Chef 
Musee d'Art Moderne, Paris 



Thomas M. Messer, Director 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 



Dr. Leonie Reygers, Director 
Museum Am Ostwall, Dortmund 









The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is the obvious institution to launch the first retro- 
spective exhibition of Albert Gleizes in America. For its collection numbers no less than 58 
paintings, drawings and prints - a wealth unattained by any other museum in this countrv. 

Such richness in the Museum's custody contrasts with a prevailing indifference toward 
Gleizes' art - an indifference that to date has remained unrelieved by a single full-fledged 
museum survey in this countrv. As a result, judgements about Gleizes and his work have been 
based too often upon ready-made assumptions and too seldom upon inspection of the works. 

As we look again, or more likely, as we look for the first time, we become aware of the in- 
sufficiency of categories and of the damaging effect of generalizations. "Cubism" as a pigeon- 
hole becomes either too small or too large to accomodate the specific contribution of Gleizes if 
we insist that the term should also retain its validity for a particular period in the painting of 
Picasso and Braque. As is made plain in a key passage of the following introduction, Gleizes 
and those sharing his thoughts were seeking different solutions and employed quite different 
means. His aspirations deserve better than to be judged, as heretofore, in terms of their 
closeness or remoteness to an imaginary prototype. 

The principal victim of superficial and generalized criticism is. of course, the individual work. 
In order to see a concentrated choice of such works for their own sake and to contemplate 
them within the amplitude of Albert Gleizes" creative development, this exhibition and cata- 
logue have been prepared. 



The reevaluation of Gleizes' contribution consists of two retrospective exhibitions, similarly 
conceived - one for North American, the other for European circulation - as well as of this 
catalogue that covers both. These separate parts of a comprehensive project were carried out 
bv Daniel Robbins. Assistant Curator of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, liears of 
close attention to Albert Gleizes' life-work have qualified Mr. Robbins to undertake a selection 
and documentation that now is gratefully acknowledged as an original and important con- 
tribution to scholarship. 

Thomas M. Messer. Director 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



My particular gratitude is due to Madame Albert Gleizes, whose enthusiasm, 
cooperation and documentary resources made this study and exhibition possible: 
to Dr. Robert Goldicater, for guiding the preparation of my related dissertation, 
submitted to the faculty of the Institute of Fine Arts, .Aezf I ork University; and 
to Jacques Barzun, for advice and assistance in locating source material. 

For their kindness and help, I leant to thank Dr. Eileen MacCarvill and Dr. Tliomas 
MacGreevey of Dublin: Rex de C. Nan Kivell, London: Bernard Dorival, Mme. 
Sonia Delaunay and Henry Zerner, Paris: Mme. Madeleine Rocher-Jauneau, 
M. and Mme. Rene De'roudille, Andre Dubois, and Jean Chevalier of Lyon: 
Georges Deloye, M. and Mme. Andre Brun, Avignon; the late Joseph Olivier of 
St. Remy-de-Provence; Walter W. Firpo and Mme. Marie Latour of Marseilles; 
Mme. Gabrielle Kueny, Grenoble ; Maurice Allemand of St. Etienne : Commandant 
Georges Houot, Toulon: Claude Gleizes and Matthew Robbins, J\eic 1 ork. 

M. Edouard Morot-Sir, French Cultural Counselor to the United States, kindly 
assisted in the negotiations of certain loans. 

Thanks are due William Camfield and Edward Fry for the contribution and gener- 
ous exchange of important documents entered in the Bibliography and Exhibition 
list. Many entries were checked by Lucy Lippard and arranged by David Robbins. 

For the generous contribution of color plates, we are indebted to Arthur G. Altschul, 
Lester Avnet, Ben Garber, Professor Milton Handler, Leonard Hutton, Rudolf 
Indlekofer, Samuel Josefowitz, Morton G. Neumann, Herbert M. Rothschild, 
Augustin Terrin, Siegfried Lllmann, Pedro Vallenilla Echeverria, Richard S. 
Zeisler, The Musee de Grenoble, Museum des 20. Jahrhunderts, Vienna and 
Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, J\eic I ork. 

Finally, I wish to acknoicledge the support of the Director and the staff of The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in the preparation of this publication, particu- 
larly Susan Tumarkin, Linda Konheim and Cara Dufour, who typed much of the 
manuscript and Dr. Louise Averill Svendsen, who edited the catalogue. 

D.R. 



LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION 



/ 



Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Altschul, New York 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester A\Tiet, Kings Point, New York 

Herbert M. Barrows, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Jacques Barzun, New York 

Madame Henri Benezit, Paris 

Rene Deroudille, Lyon 

\^ alter Firpo, Marseilles 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Freeman, New York 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Fuller, New York 

Madame P. de Gavardie, Paris 

Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris 

Germaine Henry, Paris 

Professor and Mrs. Milton Handler, New York 

Commandant Georges Houot, La Fleche, France 

Leonard Hutton-Hutschnecker, New York 

Rudolf Indlekofer. Basel 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Josefowitz, New "iork 

Josefowitz Collection, Geneva 

Messrs. Kennedy-Garber, New 'i ork 

Rex de C. Nan Kivell, London 

Edouard Labouchere, Paris 

Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Levin, Palm Beach 

Madame Ferdinand Moller, Cologne 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton G. Neumann. Chicago 

Collection Lady Norton, London 

Mr. and Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin, Philadelphia 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Rafel, South Orange, New Jersey 

Dr. Henri.' M. Roland, London 

Collection Romanet, Paris 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Rothschild, Kitchawan, New York 

Mr. and Mrs. John Strauss, Glencoe, Illinois 

Augustin Terrin, Marseilles 



Mr. and Mrs. Siegfried Ullmann. Palm Beach 

Dr. Jules Vache. Lunel, France 

Pedro \ allenilla Echeverria, Caracas 

Mr. and Mrs. Ham- Lewis ^ inston, Birmingham, Michigan 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Zacks, Toronto 

Richard S. Zeisler, New York 

Aibright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo 

The Cincinnati Art Museum 

The Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Columbus, Ohio 

Musee de Dijon 

Stadtische Galerie im Landesmuseum, Hannover 

^ adsworth Atheneum, Hartford 

The Trustees of The Tate Gallery, London 

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art 

Musee des Beaux-Arts, Lyon 

Musee Cantini. Marseilles 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New \ ork 

Rijksmuseum Kroller Muller. Otterloo 

Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris 

Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Saarland-Museum, Saarbriicken 

Musee d'Art et dTndustrie, St. Etienne 

Nationalmuseum. Stockholm 

The Art Gallery of Toronto 

Museum des 20. Jahrhunderts, Vienna 

Galerie Moos. Geneva 
Leonard Hutton Galleries, New 'iork 
Marlborough-Gerson Gallery. New ^ ork 
Galerie L. Bourdon. Paris 



11 



1881 
1900 
1902 
1903 
1905 
1906-1908 
1909-1910 
1911 



1912 

1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1921 
1922-1926 

1927 
1927-1928 

1930 

1934-1935 
1937 
1939 
1941 
1947 

1949-1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 



Born. Paris. December 8. Raised in Courbevoie. Secondary education at College Chaptal. 

'ft orked in his father's fabric design atelier. 

First exhibits at Societe Rationale des Beaux-Arts. Paris. 

First exhibits at the Salon d ' Automne. Military service until 1905. 

Founder of the Association Ernest Renan. 

Founded and participated in the Abbaye de Creteil. 

Paris, met through Mercereau. Le Fauconnier. Metzinger. Delaunay. and others. 

Exhibited in "room 41". Salon des Independants. Scandal about Cubism. 

Commenced extensive writing. Friendly \rith DuchampA illon family: 

formation of the Artists of Passy group. 

Published Du Cubisme with Metzinger. 

Assists in the formation of the Section d'Or. 

Called into Army. First completely abstract works. 

Demobilized, married Juliette Roche and visits New \ork. 

Barcelona. Spring through Autumn. 1916. 

Returns to New "i ork via Cuba. \ isits Bermuda. 

Summer in Pelham. Xew "iork: beginning of religious orientation. 

Returns to France. Spring. 

First painting students: early formulation of theories of picture construction. 

Gradual withdrawal from Paris-centered art world: 

increased interest in social and intellectual problems. 

Established Moly-Sabata. a second Utopian community of artists-craftsmen in Sablons. 

Pochoirs. often recapitulating earlier paintings, are begun in an effort 

to make reasonably priced art available to a wide public. 

Strongest Romanesque influences appear in his art and in the concurrent writing of 

La Forme et L'Histoire, published in 1932. Participates in Abstraction- Creation movement. 

Reintroduction of rigorous brush work. 

Executes murals for the Paris Exposition des Arts. 

Permanently moves to St. Remy-de-Provenee. 

Rejoins Roman Catholic church. 

Major retrospective exhibition at Lyon. Chapelle du Lycee Ampere. 

Illustrated the Pensees of Pascal. 

Awarded Grand Prix at the first French Biennial. Menton. 

The Eucharist is executed in fresco for the Chapel "Les Fontaines'" at Chantilly. 

Died. Avignon. June 23. 



12 



ALBERT GLEIZES: REASON AND FAITH IN MODERN PAINTING 



BY D1X1EL BOBBINS 



Albert Gleizes was the son of Sylvan Gleizes, a successful fabric designer and talented amateur 
painter. His maternal uncle, Leon Commerre, was a fashionable painter who had won the Prix de Rome in 
1875 as well as numerous official commissions and another uncle. Robert Gleizes, was a collector-dealer, 
specializing in eighteenth century paintings and objects. The name Gleizes, traced to Languedoc origins, is a 
Provencal version of eglise (evidence, as we shall see, in support of Lawrence Sterne's theories on the im- 
portance of names). The Gleizes' lived in Courbevoie, which at that time was quite rural, in a comfortable 
villa surrounded by a garden large enough to include a separate studio for Albert. He was always very close 
to his two sisters Suzanne and Mireille (an elder brother had died in infancy), and his paintings frequently 
include their figures as well as that of his mother. It was intended that Gleizes should receive a normal bour- 
geois education but, rebelling against the discipline of conventional methods, he frequently — and secretly — 
substituted comedy classes at the drama conservatory for attendance at his prescribed courses. When his 
authoritarian father discovered what was going on, he promptly put Albert to work in his design shop where 
he could personally supervise and discipline him. Working with fifteen or twenty other employees, Gleizes 
found the activity valuable, later claiming that the necessary precision demanded by design was important 
to his artistic training. The anonymous designs produced in the atelier were largely eighteenth century in 
inspiration (destined for draperies, upholstery and clothing), but a certain art nouveau influence also crept in. 1 

Before his twentieth birthday, Gleizes was called to military service, a prospect which filled the 
father with more pleasure than it did the son, for the youth already exhibited a tendency toward pacifism 
and a desire to become a painter. This last would have been perfectly acceptable if Albert seemed likely to 
follow the example of his academic uncle but, since he appeared to prefer the Impressionist and Neo-Impres- 
sionist painters, his ambition was frowned upon. Despite lack of encouragement, however, Gleizes began to 
paint seriously while serving in the north of France, and even submitted his works to the Salon Nationale 
des Beaux-Arts. 2 His early subject matter reveals a preoccupation with social themes: laundresses, workers 

'Some of these fabrics are still preserved in the home of the artist's sister, Mireille Houot-Nayral, at La Fleche. 

2 The Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts was founded in 1890 by a group of dissident artists, including Puvis de Chavannes 
and Rodin, in opposition to the Societe des Artistes Francais, the official salon. See John Rewald, Post Impressionism: 
From Van Gogh to Gauguin, New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1956, p. 462. 



13 



on the quais, factory laborers; but it also included some mysterious night scenes: small solitary figures 
writing by lantern light in front of camp tents, or the silhouette of a wind mi ll or church seen against a night 
sky. Gleizes and his closest friend, the future poet-writer Rene Arcos, had developed an inclination for sym- 
bolist poetry and for the politics of democratic socialism. Believing ardently in simple brotherhood without 
organized religion, they read and admired W hitman. \ erhaeran and Ernest Renan; the philosophy of Compte, 
the sociology' of Durkheim. the music of \^ agner. the painting of Pissarro, the history of Taine and Michelet. 
all these contained concepts which influenced the two friends before they began active participation in the 
broader cultural world. 

For the first five years of his serious artistic life, from about 1901-05. Gleizes appears to have had 
little direct awareness of activity in the art world, even less contact with other painters. Certainly, he was 
familiar with the work of Pissarro and Seurat and he admired Gauguin^, but these connections provided 
vicarious rather than experienced culture. In contrast, young painters like Braque and Picasso, even Metzinger 
and Delaunay (who. as Gleizes' friends, were later to share many of his ideals), already were engaged in a 
struggle for recognition. In Paris they learned the channels for success, the structure of relationships and 
contacts, the development of the gallery-centered art market, and they observed with interest the growth of 
various personalities and schools. The unsophisticated Gleizes however, regarded the city as a bourgeois 
creation, a destestable place designed to trap artists as it trapped workers into a thousand evils, the worst of 
which would have been the corruption conferred by bourgeois approval. 

Notwithstanding their aversion to bourgeois city culture, Gleizes and Arcos, on completing their 
military sendee, became involved with contemporary intellectual efforts, particularly those of a group of 
sympathetic young writers who had been associated with the shortlived review La J ie. (including Duhamel, 
Romains. \ ildrac and Mercereau). Believing that artists, intellectuals and workers were natural allies, all 
chafing under the inequalities of the same system, and inspired by Gustave Kahn's Samedis Populaires and 
other mutualites. they helped to establish the Association Ernest Renan, a kind of popular university" de- 
signed to bring working men and intellectuals — particularly artists — together. In 1906. with the financial aid 
of a new friend, Henri Martin Barzun. these young men established the Abbaye de Creteil. a phalanstery for 
artists and writers. Barzun, rather more sophisticated than his fellow-idealists of the Abbaye, also introduced 
Gleizes to the specific history of Utopian socialism. 4 

Obviously, although Gleizes did not enter the Abbaye with a specific program and a crystallized 
ideal, the conditions of his earlier fife and interests anticipated — even necessitated — his desire to found such 
a community. His early works, developed in isolation, consistently investing a vista or a genre scene with 
broader significance than the subject normally permitted, often reconciled the contrasts of exterior and in- 
terior or united ancient usage with modern practice in simultaneously plastic and symbolic terms. Gleizes 
seems never to have been absorbed by pure \ision but always hinted at something more, at relationships and 
symbols. Thus, he would try to situate the whole of the modern city, an organism basically alien to him, 
within the broader context of surrounding countryside. Similarly, he was haunted by the synthetic possibili- 
ties of a river, not as an idyllic setting but as a source of life, an intrusion of external time and substance into 
the cities of the Ile-de-France. These concerns were all brought to the Abbaye, where they were expanded 
and matured. 

The Abbaye, supposedly supporting itself through the communal metier of publishing, received 
the blessing of many Symbolists, but it was not long before its members began to break with the forms of art 
that had been practiced by the admired older generation. Like many Symbolists, the Abbaye artists scorned 



3 In an unpublished part of his Souvenirs Gleizes wrote that an initial idea for the Abbaye of Creteil was to escape from 
corrupt Western civilization to the simplicity f life in the South Seas, as he then believed Gauguin had done. 

4 Barzun had been as deeply involved with politics as with poetry. In addition to publishing L Art Social from 1905, he 
had served as secretary to Paul Boncour. 



14 



the structure of a bourgeois world and sought to substitute a communal society, but they did not reject the 
themes of modern life in favor of the Symbolist focus on single elements and internal, individual images. 
Thev wished instead to create an epic and heroic art, stripped of ornament and obscure allegory, an art 
dealing with the relevant subjects of modern life: crowds, man and machines, even, ultimately, the city itself. 
It can be argued, of course, that the Abbaye intentions — vast as they were — remained unfulfilled and that 
their dream, like that of the Symbolists before them, was an escape from reality. Yet there were important 
distinctions, for the Abbaye intention to create a total future a priori ruled out the Symbolist technique of 
creating solely from an aesthetic or a closed ideal. 

If the physical scope and appearance of the world in 1906-07 hinted at the vast changes in progress, 
the Abbaye artists expected much more. It is important to realize that their vision, although responding to 
the conditions of modern life, did not seek to imitate those conditions, as Gleizes later accused the Futurist 
artists of doing.5 Gleizes and his associates dreamed of creating the future and collectivity, multiplicity, 
simultaneity were the key Abbaye concepts manifest in the work of Barzun, Arcos. and especially in the 
related Unanimism of Jules Romains. Theirs was a self-conscious art, a synthetic concept of the possibilities 
of the future. Their images invariably encompassed broad subjects winch, although dealing with reality, were 
restricted neither by the limitations of physical perception nor by a separation of scientific fact from intellec- 
tual meaning — even symbolic meaning. Even their images of simultaneity were synthetic because scope was 
too vast, both physically and symbolically, for one man's limited participation. The Abbaye, whose fame 
circulated even in Moscow, attracted many artists. Marinetti and Brancusi were visitors there and young 
writers like Roger Allard (one of the first to defend Cubism), Pierre Jean Jouve, and Paul Castiaux are typical 
of the artists who wanted to have the Abbaye publish their works. Nevertheless, after only two years, the 
Abbaye was forced to close, mainly because of material hardship. There simply was not enough money to 
keep going. 

Gleizes' style changed rapidly at the Abbaye. From a technique of paint application akin to Pointill- 
ism and a light palette similar to Impressionism, Iris paint handling became more robust, areas of color and 
brushwork grew simpler, and his structural rhythms became more pronounced, although softened by more 
curvilinear forms. A synthetic view of the universe, presenting the remarkable phenomena of time and space, 
multiplicity and diversity, at once was his painted equivalent to the ideals which were verbally realized in the 
Abbaye poetry. Experienced in the treatment of inclusive landscapes, he nevertheless had to solve the problem 
of balancing many simultaneous visions on a painted surface. Gleizes mitigated the distortion of distance by 
linear perspective, by flattening the picture plane; his skies were on the same plane as the simple flat 
objects in front and, although scale was retained, a form in the distance would be brought to the foreground 
by making it bright. Every element of the painting had to be reduced to clear planes, treated as uniformly as 
possible, for attention lavished on any one part would jeopardize the whole dehcate balance. In 1908, although 
color range expanded in the winter river scenes and contracted in the summer landscapes, the horizon line 
consist ently crept higher and higher. 

Unknown to Gleizes, Le Fauconnier, who was living in comparative isolation in Brittany, was pur- 
suing similar ends. The strange, red-bearded northerner, a former student at the Academie Julian and a 
friend of Denis and the Nabis. was painting rocks and sea. His rocks became progressively more geometric 
and his sea crept higher up the picture plane. He exhibited his rocks at the Independants in 1909 but Gleizes, 
who had not yet exhibited in that salon, appears not to have seen the work, for the two artists, although 
probably first introduced by Jouve or Castiaux, (the editors ofLes Bandeaux a" Or) did not know each other's 
work until 1909 when they met again through Alexandre Mercereau. Mercereau, perhaps, realized even be- 
fore they did the extent of their common interests. 

In the Salon (TAutomne of 1909, however, Gleizes saw his new friend's portrait of Pierre Jean 
Jouve and, as he recorded in his Souvenirs, was deeply impressed by the painting. (Gleizes was not represented 



5 See Gleizes, "Des 'ismes'; vers une Renaissance plastique", Tradition et Cubisme, Paris, Povolovzky, 1927, p. 168 (first 
published in La Vie des Lettres et des Arts, 1921). 



15 





Fig. 1. Henri Le Fauconnier: 
PORTRAIT OF PAUL CASTIAUX. 1910. 
Oil on canvas, 40i X 31+" (100 X 80 cm.). 
Private collection. 



Fig. 2. Albert Gleizes: 

PORTRAIT OF R.G.(leizes). 1910. Catalogue no. 20. 



in that salon although he had exhibited there in 1903 and 1904). It is not unlikely that Gleizes" strong response 
arose from the fact that Le Fauconnier's painting, actually less geometric than Gleizes' 1908 Pyrenees land- 
scapes, applied sympathetic techniques to figure treatment. Gleizes had sketched figures often enough, but 
because his search for a synthetic \ision that would reconcile disparate elements had fostered a natural pre- 
dilection for landscape, his figure paintings were few. The Salon des Independants, 1910. saw the immediate 
influence of Le Fauconnier in Gleizes" large portrait (now lost) of Rene Arcos. An oil sketch from 1909. 
however, remains in the collection of Madame Gleizes and its combination of curves and straight lines, 
strikingly related to the Jouve portrait, depicts Arcos in a dark, flatly-rendered coat, striding across an enor- 
mous landscape. In 1910 both artists continued to concentrate on figures: Le Fauconnier on a portrait of the 
poet Paul Castiaux and Gleizes on a majestic portrait of his uncle. Robert Gleizes. The two works are very 
close and establish Gleizes' debt to Le Fauconnier for ha\ing stimulated his interest to encompas a new and 
important element, the figure. 

Mercereau is also responsible for having introduced Gleizes to Metzinger in 1910. the same year 
that Mercereau included these three artists in a Moscow exhibition — probably the first Jack of Diamonds 
Exhibition. (Even before this meeting, Gleizes and Metzinger had been linked by \ auxcehVs disparaging 
comments on "des cubes Blafards" 6 , which surely referred to Metzinger's Portrait of Apollinaire and Gleizes' 
Tree at the Salon des Independants .) Mercereau. who had missed the opening of the Abbaye in order to ac- 
company Nicolas Riabouchinsky to Moscow, had previously included Gleizes' Les Brumes du Matin sur la 
Marne in a Russian exhibition of 1908. 7 

Given Mercereau's long standing delight in promoting group activity, it is easy to recognize his 
pleasure in having brought together three painters whose works exhibited similar interests and who could be 
identified with his own synthetic ideals, ideals which had been influential in the Abbaye's development. As 



6 Gil Bias, March 18, 1910. quoted in John Golding, Cubism, London, 1959, p. 22. 
'See Toison d'Or, Moscow, 1908, nos. 7-10, p. 15. 



16 



organizer of the literary section of the Salon d'Automne of 1909. he was able to introduce Gleizes to painters 
exhibiting there and to introduce his own concepts to the world of painting. Metzinger. in his study of Merce- 
reau s . noted that the 1905 Les Thuribulums Affaisses had been an attempt to adjust the methods of the 
fading Symbolists to new concepts and that in the 1910 work Les Contes des Tenebres. Mercereau had ban- 
ished "anecdotal appearances", had made different forces operate within the same character and (like the 
painters) had changed settings rapidly and fantastically. 

Thus, in 1909 and 1910. a significant group of painters came to be integrated with Gleizes" older 
circle of friends. The entire group, including Allard (whose book Le Bocage Amoureaux Gleizes was illustra- 
ting in 1910). Barzun. Beauduin. Castiaux. Divoire. Parmentier, Marinetti. Theo A arlet. and even Apollinaire 
and Salmon, became party" to the ideas of the Abbaye. 9 Apollinaire and Salmon were only peripheral members. 
of course, the chameleon Apollinaire participating in almost every literary and artistic circle, but it is clear 
that Apollinaire"s conception of Cubism was influenced by the epic notions found in the old Abbaye circle. 
In his preface to the 1911 Brussels Independants, he wTote: "...thus has come a simple and noble art. expres- 
sive and measured, eager to discover beauty-, and entirely ready to tackle those vast subjects which the painters 
of yesterday did not dare to undertake, abandoning them to the presumptuous, old-fashioned and boring 
daubers of the official Salons. " (italics mine). This conception is not based on the analytical Cubism of Picasso 
and Braque. which had already contracted to the intensive study of form, had almost annihilated subject 
confined in extremely shallow space. Instead, it suggests the broad concepts held by the Mercereau-Gleizes 
circle, concepts which were at that time visible only in the paintings of Gleizes. Delaunay. Le Fauconnier 
and Leger. The subjects treated by these Cubists, so markedly different from the isolated still fifes or figures 
chosen by Picasso and Braque. have vital significance both as intentions and as productive of different forms. 
Their significance is not diminished by the fact that the subjects themselves changed in the course of con- 
ceptual and technical advances, eventually being absorbed by the abstract art of Gleizes and Delaunay. 

As .Allard wrote of Gleizes. Le Fauconnier and Metzinger. in a review- of the 1910 Salon d'Automne. 
"Thus is born at the antipodes of impressionism an art which cares little to imitate the occasional cosmic 
episode, but which offers to the intelligence of the spectator the essential elements of a synthesis in time, in 
all its pictorial fullness." 10 The synthetic preoccupation with epic themes was destined to develop and to be 
transformed into abstract art in the work of Delaunay and Gleizes. In order to understand the passage of 
Gleizes" painting from an epic, visionary (as opposed to 'visual) reality- to abstraction, it is important to under- 
stand his early Cubist style and its differences from our traditional understanding of analytic Cubism. \^ e 
have ahead}- discussed some of the thoughts stemming from abstract considerations of relationships that 
intervened between appearances and the paintings of Gleizes and his friends. These involved the interaction 
of vast space with speed and action, with simultaneous work, commerce, sport, and flight: with the modern 
city- and the ancient country-, with the river, the harbor and the bridge and, above all. with time, for the sense 
of time — involving memory, tradition and accumulated cultural thought — created the reality- of the w-orld. 

In poetry-, this post-symbolist attempt to achieve new forms had to break decisively with the old 
unities of time, place and action. Unity of scene did not correspond with the reality- of modem life; unity of 
time did not correspond with the culturally known and anticipated effects of change. That is why Mercereau 
(as Metzinger noted) H shifted his scenes so violently, why Barzun tried to solve the problem of simultaneously 
developing lines of action by choral chanting. Similarly Gleizes and his painter friends sought to create a 
vision free from introverted or obscure imagery which could treat collective and simultaneous factors. This 
necessitated a new kind of allegory opposed to the old meaning which presented one thing as the symbolic 



s Jean Metzinger. '"Alexandre Mercereau", Vers et Prose. Paris, no. 27, October-December, 1911, p. 122. 

'For a discussion of the Abbave. see Daniel Robbins. '"From Svmbolism to Cubism: the Abbave of Creteil", The Art 
Journal, "Sinter, 1963-64, XXIII 2. pp. 111-116. 

'"Roger AUard. "Au Salon d'Automne de Paris", V Art Libre, Lyon, October-Xovember, 1910. 

"See Metzinger, op. cit. 



17 



equivalent of another. A tentative precedent perhaps existed in Courbet' s Real Allegory which, however, 
might have been considered an allegorical failure by Gleizes and Metzinger because Courbet "did not suspect 
that the visible world only became the real world by the operation of thought."! 2 

Modifications of one form by another are quite apparent, to be sure, but their relationships are made 
even clearer by contemplation stimulated by \ision. The organic process of life and civilization, moving 
irresistably toward harmonious interaction, was the subject of Gleizes' art. This subject was treated neither 
as a confined symbolic allegory nor as a cultural background indicated by specific real appearance, but was 
instead presented in concrete and precise terms. Gleizes r Harvest Threshing, the masterpiece of the Section 
d'Or (no. 34), is not merely an anecdote in a scene. Rather, it is a multiple panorama celebrating the worker, 
his material life and his collective activity in securing that life on a permanently changing land. Gleizes con- 
fronts us not with one action or place, but with many: not with one time, but with past and future as well as 
present. 

In contrast to Picasso and Braque, Gleizes never set out to analyze and describe visual reality. 
A mandolin, guitar, pipe or bow] of fruit — all more or less neutral objects from daily Hfe — could not satisfy 
his complex idealistic concepts of true reality. He always stressed subjects of vast scale and of provocative 
social and cultural meaning. He regarded the painting as the area where mental awareness and the real space 
of the world could not only meet but also be resolved. The iconography of Gleizes, as of Delaunay, Le Faucon- 
nier and Leger, helps to explain why there is no period in their work corresponding closely to the analytic 
Cubism developed by Picasso and Braque. It also explains why it was possible for Gleizes and Delaunay to 
become abstract painters, more theoretically sympathetic to Kandinsky and Mondrian than to Picasso, 
Braque and Gris, who always remained associated with visual reality. 

Given the already established principle that the space of the physical world is not the same as the 
space of a picture plane and accepting the conviction that perception of the physical world is deformed by 
the effects of distance, Gleizes' artistic concern was to reconstitute and synthesize the real world according 
to his individual consciousness. A major factor in his process was the study of volumes utilized to convey the 
known solidity and structure of objects, their weight, placement and effects upon each other. Add to this the 
inseparability of form and color, the modifications in one causing changes to appear in the other (one of the 
principal lessons of Cezanne) and we arrive at Gleizes' 1910-11 style of painting. Although forms are simpli- 
fied and distorted, each shape and color modified by another, they are not splintered. Although his color is 
sober, it is always rich, never grisaille. 

Gleizes did not use the device (found in many works by Picasso and Braque) which involved 
placement of the form in a shallow space, usually down the center of the canvas, the edges filled with a tex- 
tured horizontal brushwork. sometimes modifying the composition into an elegant oval. Having always to 
do with the synthetic treatment of a broad subject, no part of his canvas received less attention than another. 
Consequently, Gleizes always had to grapple with the problem of getting into the picture plane, a search that 
led him in 1913 to develop compositional innovations: broad, tilting planes that provide a transition from the 
perimetric rectangle to the rotating forms at the heart of the painting. 

Nothing testified more clearly that Gleizes was aware of the differences between his own interests 
and those of Picasso and Braque than the article he wrote after seeing Picasso's work for the first time. lj 
Having quoted Apollinaire's remarks 14 about a return to the grand principles of structure, color and in- 
spiration, he wrote "that the very valuable [precieuses] indications of Picasso and Braque, in spite of every- 
thing, did not depart from an impressionism of form which, nevertheless, they opposed to (an impressionism 



'■Albert Gleizes and Jean Metzinger, Du Cubisme, Paris, 1912. The authors begin their work with a discussion of Courbet. 

"Gleizes and Le Fauconnier are supposed to have met Picasso for the first time when Apollinaire introduced them in a bar, 
Rue d'Antin, at the moment of the Salon d' Automne. 1911. They accompanied Picasso and Apollinaire to Kahnweiler's 
gallery to look at Picasso's paintings. See: Gleizes, Souvenirs: see also Gleizes. "L'Epopee", Le Rouge et le S\oir, October, 
1929, p. 63; see Golding, op. cit., p. 23: see Cabanne, L'Epopee, Paris, 1963, p. 163. Kahnweiler, however, in conver- 
sation and in letters to the author, claims, to the best of his recollection, that Gleizes visited his gallery before this date. 

"From the catalogue preface to the Brussels Independents, 1911, (see p. 16 supra). 



18 




Fig. 3. Albert Gleizes: THE CITY AND THE RIVER. 1913. Fig. 4. Albert Gleizes: THE CITY AND THE RIVER. 1913. 
Catalogue no. 46. Oil on canvas, 86} X 73}" (220 X 187 cm.). 

Whereabouts unknown. 



of) color." !5 Gleizes considered the analytical Cubist works of Picasso and Braque. those fugues of intersecting 
planes, as "an impressionism of form" because of the emphasis on relationships and rhythms set up by parts 
of a dissected subject. He realized that they were quite distinct from his main concern which was to establish 
weight, density and volumetric relationships among parts of a broad subject. Although Gleizes himself 
characterized this phase of his work as an "analysis of volume relationships," it bears little similarity to the 
traditional use of the word "analytical" in our understanding of Cubism. 

In the little reviews and newspapers from pre- World War I Paris, Gleizes had always been identified 
as one of the Cubist avant-garde. In the journals that chronicle the development of French modernism in 
the twenties, he continued to hold a prominent place, but he was no longer identified with the avant-garde 
because Cubism itself was no longer the avant-garde. Instead, it was regarded by some people as a freak, a 
phenomenon that had passed, or it was looked upon by others merely as groundwork for the newer freedom 
of Dada or the more specific program of Surrealism. Even after historians began their attempts to analyze 
the obviously vital role played by Cubism, the name of Albert Gleizes was always mentioned because of his 
early and important participation in the movement. Yet, by the thirties he came to be regarded as an anachro- 
nism for, being alive and decidedly articulate, he had never ceased to call himself a Cubist and presumably 
a Cubist he remained. Unlike Picasso, he had neither participated in Surrealism nor returned to reality. Nor 
did he practice that most rational and ordered art, Neo-Plasticism. Although in many ways his theories were 
close to those developed by Mondrian, his paintings never submitted to the discipline of primary colors and 
the right angle ; they did not look Neo-Plastic. In fact, they looked like nothing else that was being done and 
indeed, they were rarely seen in the art world because Gleizes deliberately held himself aloof from extensive 
participation in the Paris scene. In the 1940's, after a decade of infrequent and generally negative criticism 
from the accepted art press, he was actively taken up by a small group of Catholic intellectuals who regarded 



]5 Albert Gleizes, "L'Art et ses representants, Jean Metzinger", La Revue Independant, no. 4, September, 1911, p. 164. 



19 



him as something of a hero-saint. Criticism continued in this dual vein until his death: a puzzling artist 
claimed and admired by a small group of dedicated followers, fervently respected by his few former pupils, 
but almost ignored by influential critics for some thirty years. 

The literature of Cubism, (as of all twentieth century painting) may be divided into two categories: 
contemporary criticism and historical study — the two overlapping and intermingling as our centurv advanced. 
Serious historical study of Cubism, (distinct from criticism), began in the late 1920"s. Drawing at first from 
sources of limited original data, chiefly the opinions of Apolliniare. it came to rely heavily on Der Weg zum 
Kubismus. (published in 1920 although begun in 1915). an important book by Daniel Henry Kahnweiler, 
which concentrated on the development of four Cubist painters. Picasso. Braque. Leger and Gris. Our tradi- 
tional understanding of Cubism has evolved from Kahnweiler s discussion, which was based, to some extent, 
on the ideas of Juan Gris 16 and the two major terms "analytical" and "synthetic", which subsequentlv emerged, 
have been widely accepted since the mid-thirties 1 ". Both terms are historical impositions that occurred after 
the facts they identify, for neither phase was so designated or explained at the time corresponding works 
were being created. Their wide acceptance was at least partially due to an historical desire to give pattern and 
continuity to the course of a painting tradition which by 1911 had been irrevocablv affected bv the Cubist 
revolution. This, of course, does not invalidate our use of the words analytical and svnthetic but it does 
suggest that a further examination of them might be well advised. 

Analytical and synthetic, due to their clear applicability to the paintings of Picasso. Braque and 
Gris. have long seemed to be perfectly acceptable descriptions of Cubism's development. By 1911. the shat- 
tered planes of Braque and Picasso reached "analytical" pinnacles where the initial subjects were only hinted 
at within the context of the new reality : the painting itself. T\ ith the introduction of collage, there emerged 
a simplification resulting from the broader and flatter shapes of introduced fragments of reality which were 
reconstituted into a new "synthetic" whole that was. in fact, an image of reality". In addition to the ruin phases 
of Cubism the traditional -view also relies heavily on another pair of significant elements: the remarkable 
Picasso painting, the Demoiselles d 'Avignon and the influence of primitive, particularly African and Cata- 
lonian. sculpture on the Cubist painters. 

The most serious general objection to an historical tradition which regards the Demoiselles as the 
origin of Cubism and. noting the evident influence of primitive art on it. as symptomatic of Cubism's relation- 
ship to primitive form is that such deductions are unhistorical. Despite the tempting advantage of simplicity, 
this familiar explanation fails to give adequate consideration to the complexities of a flourishing art that 
existed just before and during the period when Picasso's new painting developed. More than fifty years later, 
we are only beginning to examine the relationships between Cubism and contemporary developments in 
Germany. Holland. Italy and Russia, where a self-conscious search for a new style was also causing rapid 
changes in art. If we elect the Demoiselles as the beginning, we must forget that the Impressionists used the 
double point of view or that the Symbolists (who admired Cezanne, too) flattened the picture plane, reducing 
their subjects to simple geometrv. Y\ e find ourselves minimising the influence of Nee-Impressionist structure 
and subject matter, not because we do not admire Seurat. but because we cannot see his preoccupations 
reflected in the Demoiselles, (or in the subsequent work of Picasso and Braque). Similarly, by accepting the 
simplified view of the Cubist revolution, we tend to neglect parallels in the development of literature and 
social thought, turning to them only after 1911. after Cubism had become a recognized movement. Y\ e even 
cut ourselves off from a satisfactorv explanation of Fau\ism. especially with regard to Braque's Fauve period 
and its consequences for his Cubist activity. 

These, brieflv. are some of the major objections that can immediately be raised to the dominant 
historical view of Cubism as descending from the Demoiselles, as a system developed across analytic and 
synthetic phases by Picasso and Braque and practiced only later by Gris and Leger. As a valuable interpreta- 



16 See Daniel Henry Kahnweiler, Juan Gris: Sa T'ie. Son Oeuvre, Ses Ecrits. Paris, Gallimard. 1947. (English translation 
by Douglas Cooper, New York. Valentin, 1947, pp. 144. 145). Gris" reply to the questionnaire "Chezles Cubistes". Bulletin 
de la Vie Artistique, Paris, 6th year, no. 1, pp. 15—17, January 1, 1925. 

17 See Alfred H. Barr. Jr., Cubism and Abstract Art. New York, The Museum of Modern Art. 1936. pp. 29. 31—12. 77-95. 



20 



tion of these painters it has both validity and understanding but as historical analysis of the general develop- 
ment of painting it is incomplete and misleading. 

Certainly, it matters little what designation later historians apply to events. If Kahnweiler considers 
Cubism as Picasso and Braque. our only fault is in subjecting other Cubists' works to the rigors of that 
hmited definition. The contemporary historian should analyze other Cubist works, even if in the process a 
qualifying adjective must be added to differentiate between branches of Cubism. 

The traditional interpretation, formulated post facto to assist in an appreciation of the works of 
Braque and Picasso, naturally has also affected our understanding of other twentieth centurv French painters. 
But it is difficult to apply to men such as Delaunay. Gleizes. A illon. Metzinger. and Le Fauconnier. who 
exhibit such fundamental differences from the traditional Cubist works that Kahnweiler even questions their 
rigbt to be called Cubists at all. If the now historical interpretation is regarded as an ideal definition, 
naturally these men will fall short of it. To suggest that merely because these artists developed differently or 
varied from the traditional pattern they deserved to be relegated to a secondary or satellite role in Cubism 
is a profound mistake. Similarly, it is foolish to assume that they did not understand Cubism's real meaning, 
which traditionally had been defined \rithout an examiniation of their work. Clearly it would be useful to 
examine their intentions, techniques and theories as carefully as we have those of Picasso and Braque, if 
necessary adjusting or redefining our theories to take account of what we find. 

Our theoretical understanding of Cubism has changed very little since the main interpretive fines 
were first explored during the 1930s. Recent studies have gathered and sifted a quantity of important docu- 
ments from the original period but this information has generally been fitted into the existing framework, 
contributing many details but merely solidifying our extant comprehension of the movement. 

The history of the very word "Cubism" illustrates the dangers inherent in our traditional approach 
to the history of Cubism. Like the names of many other art movements, its general use was an accident. The 
traditional approach stresses the fact that Matisse referred to cubes in connection with a Braque painting of 
1908 and that the term was published twice by the critic Louis ^ auxcelles ls in a similar context. It is interesting 
to observe, however, that Louis Chassevent, another critic, made a reference to Cubism as early as 1906 but. 
since it was made in reference to Delaunay and Metzinger rather than to Picasso or Braque, its possible 
significance has not been explored. 19 Recent studies have confirmed that the term did not come into anything 
like general usage until 1911. and then mostly in connection with Gleizes, Metzinger. Delaunay and Leger. 
If, in attaching special meaning to the word's history (as historians tend to do) one had sought to find prece- 
dence in connection with Metzinger and Delaunay rather than with Picasso and Braque. Chassevent' s use of 
the "cube" might have assumed the retrospective significance now attached to \ auxcelles' remarks. Thus. 
the significance of the word itself is a matter of perspective for, in connection with a 1908 Braque, its general 
acceptance as the "beginning" of Cubism seems to have occurred because it suited an historical framework 
in which the historian deliberately sought evidence from an already specified direction. In contrast, recog- 
nizing its 1906 usage and the context of its general acceptance in 1911 as the basis, a different historian would 
be equally justified in identifying Cubism with the efforts of a second group of artists — those who were suffi- 
ciently products of their art-culture to fight their battles publicly in the traditional arena: the great salons. 

In its earliest usage, the word was a rough characterization of the geometric appearance of certain 
canvases. In 1911, Apollinaire accepted the term on behalf of a group of artists who had been invited to 
exhibit at the Brussels Independants- and the following year. Gleizes and Metzinger wrote and published 
Du Cubisme. an effort to dispel the confusion raging around the word. Clarifying their aims as painters, this 
work was, in effect, the first definition of Cubism and it still remains the clearest and most intelligible. The 
result not merelv of collaboration between its two authors but also of discussion bv the circle of artists who 



' 3 Gil Bias, November 14. 1908: Gil Bias. May 25. 1909. See Golding, op cit., p. 20. 

"Louis Chassevent, "Les Artistes Independants, 1906", Quelques Petits Salons. Paris, 1908, p. 32. Chassevent discussed 
Delaunay and Metzinger in terms of Signacs influence, referring to Metzingers "precision in the cut of his cubes...' 



20 See p. 16 for quotation. 



21 



met in Puteaux and Courbevoie. it reflects the attitudes of the "artists of Passy", which included the Duchamp- 
Villon brothers, to whom parts of it were read before publication. 

Why did these artists evidently want so much to be understood? It was because they had arrived 
at their art after a slow and meticulous search and did not relish (any more than had Manet or Cezanne) being 
taken for madmen. Their visual ideas were susceptible to formulation and. conceiving art as a social function, 
the authors felt a responsibility to articulate their eridently baffling painting. Such mental attitudes, while 
perhaps not the stuff of novels, are readily understandable in men who grew up at the end of the nineteenth 
century, imbued with optimism, believing that environment could be shaped, that life could be improved 
and — especially — that art, affecting both environment and man. was destined to expand its role in the human 
consciousness. The whole of the art and life of -Albert Gleizes testifies to his consistent attempt to realize those 
aims. In examining his work — especially in relation to the succeeding interests and influences it manifests 
— we discover, if not alternatives to the dominant attitude, at least valuable supplementary information. 
Gleizes is a particularly good subject, for not only was he a fine artist but he was also a brilliant theoretician, 
even philosopher, who left lucid and logical evidence of his self-conscious development. In Du Cubisme, 
Gleizes and Metzinger pointed to their specific intentions when they wrote: "...let us admit that the reminis- 
cence of natural forms cannot be banished — in any event, not yet. An art cannot be raised to the level of pure 
effusion at the first step." In 1912, however, that very year. Delaunay painted his simultaneous discs, in a 
single unprecedented jump raising the epic subject to cosmic proportions, going far beyond Gleizes' Meudon 
Landscape. 1911, and Metzinger's Port. But the audacity of Delaunay's synthesis of the sun and moon, day- 
light and darkness in the whirl of his simultaneous discs had a parallel, perhaps even a source, in Barzun's 
imagery from La Terrestre Tragedie, published by the Abbaye in 1907: 

"In a single glance. I wrap up the earth: 

Occident, Orient, both hemispheres — all the globe! 

Bathed in daylight and night." 
For two years Gleizes meditated on the significance of what Delaunay had accompbshed against 
all expectations. Expressing thoughts which led to the transformation of his owm art in 1914—15, Gleizes 
wrote: "...In 1913 Delaunay defined the goal of Cubism... Behind that luxuriant color... one could realize 
what Mallarme meant by "azure', the perception of plasticity in lime, perfect, final, circling, astronomical. 
Delaunay played with moons and suns like a wondering child."21 

Gleizes became obsessed by the search for plastic equivalents of the great themes which had ab- 
sorbed him for so long but he also became convinced that for every combination of perceptions there was a 
plastic truth. This development can almost be charted in his portraits of Florent Schmitt. In the 1915 Song 
of War. (no. 71) the musician's features and movements were described, even though they were contracted 
to forceful rhythms. But in the later version (no. 72) the figure itself has disappeared, replaced by a synthesis 
of essential plastic equivalents of his physical reality. The Lorraine Pitcher (no. 75) and its preparatory water- 
colors (no. 74) witness the same process and in a series of paintings of Toul, Gleizes experimented with the 
plastic translation of one of his most cherished themes, the city which draws life from the river. His old 
interests were intensified and pursued even when he came to America. The three Brooklyn Bridge paintings 
are key examples. Similarly, his continuous development is documented by the 1917 painting Stunt Flying 
which derives from the 1914 Acrobats. In the earlier work, three trapezists are frozen in flight, suspended in 
a specifically described circus environment. In Stunt Flying, however, imitated forms are abolished, replaced 
by soaring rhythm, the exultant sensations of height and velocity. This synthesis of controlled kinesthetic 
action within a given experience is achieved without the methodology of simultaneous -news, without facetting 
or fragmentation, even without Gleizes' own technique of volumetric relationships. 



21 ALbert Gleizes, Robert Delaunay, an unpublished manuscript prepared for Abstraction-Creation in 1933, revised in 1937 
and 1945. 



22 



Between 1914 and 1917, Gleizes' evolution was not marked by absolute consistency, for the artist 
did not conceptually lead his painting toward unshakeable convictions. His w'ork was always directly engaged 
with environment, especially an unfamiliar one. Thus, his 1916 voyage to Spain resulted in a number of ob- 
viously Spanish paintings, (no. 104) hot and exuberant 2 - (as well as in a lost Sailboat painting, more consonant 
with the general course of his development in synthetic abstraction) and few of his paintings are as sensual 
and immediate as those of Bermuda in which a Cezannesque concern for light-modified forms and his con- 
sistent diagonal brushwork overcome any conceptual efforts. Gleizes' concern for human and social values, 
the very basis of both his subject matter and his individual plastic treatment, did not diminish as his style 
developed certainty. On the contrary, it increased and at one point, judging by a sudden reduction of his 
activity in 1918, it even seems to have threatened his life as an artist. Li\ing in the most modern city in the 
world, the very epitome of collective life, he was alternately exhilarated by its energy and depressed by its 
industrial conformity, its monotonous production of drab, tasteless shapes. This experience of the "future" 
occurred at the very moment when he was writing about the need to subordinate individual ego to the greater 
life of the group in L'Art dans V Evolution Generate, and was still optimistic about the course of events in 
Russia. He was torn apart by conflicting forces; his cherished ideals were all but contradicted by a maddening 
reality. 

These conflicts doubtless contributed to an unforeseen experience which took place in the summer of 
1918 at the Gleizes" rented house in Pelham. New 7 York. One afternoon. Albert Gleizes came to his wife and said, 
"A terrible thing has happened to me: I believe I am finding God. "23 This new religious conviction resulted 
not from any mystical visions but instead from Gleizes' rational confrontation of three urgent problems : 
collective order, individual differences and the painter's role. Although Gleizes did not join the Church until 
1941. his next twenty-five years were spent in a logical effort not only to find God but also to have faith. The 
many-levelled struggle was enacted on the plane of painting, supported by writing and by the manner in which 
he chose to organize his life. To him, all human activity was inextricably interrelated and he believed that in the 
post-war w-orld the principles once thought to be the foundations of society were exhausted, no longer valid. 
"...In all the spheres of the human spirit, there w 7 as not one where night was so solidly entrenched as in art. It 
was an ivory tower, it spoke a strange language, unintelligible to those wiio lived in the world . . . The Artist [had 
become] a curious being, an anarchist, a product of spontaneous generation, a being apart from the crowd." 24 

His dissatisfaction with the old system and with the anarchy of art led Gleizes toward a passionate 
pursuit for an absolute order. His self-discipline was extreme, including even renunciation of the broad and 
powerful touch so characteristic of all his previous painting. The ehmination of bewitching textures, surface 
variations and sensual paint were the clearest sacrifices his own painterly ego could make; plastic interest 
would henceforth reside in the relationships among forms and shapes, relationships that would communicate 
the austere essentials usually clouded by appearances. The most disciplined works from the twenties do not 
produce the tenderest results but, although achieving their effects by color and form alone, Gleizes retained 
even in their extreme austerity a more varied pallette than any of his contemporaries: violets, pinks and 
yellows acting on each other. He regarded as false and pernicious the distinction between easel painting and 
decoration, developed and sustained for so long only because of the pretensions of class society. Thus, in his 
effort to abolish that distinction, he created paintings like In the City and Along the Avenue, preliminaries 
to an enormous project for the Gare de M(oscow) wliich, of course, was never realized. 25 Yet, even as he 



"Such a work also reveals in a direct fashion the influence of early training in his father's design atelier. 

"Juliette Roche Gleizes, Memoirs, to be published soon. See also J. R. G., "La Belle Journee est Passee". Zodiaque, no. 25, 
April, 1955, p. 34. 

24 Albert Gleizes, L'Art dans V Evolution Generate, unpublished manuscript, written in New York, 1917. 

25 The project for the Gare de M is in the collection of the Musee de Grenoble. 



23 



purged his art of textures, his color doubled its intensity and his own personality persistently cropped up in 
vigorous and unique patterns — bars, dots, hatchings and curves, intersections and reverses. 

During the early twenties, Gleizes' conscious cultivation of certain subjects at the expense of others 
became a factor increasingly vital to his artistic developments. In the works from 1914 through the end of 
the New York period, paintings without subject and paintings with an evident visual basis exist side by side, 
their difference in degree of abstraction hidden by the uniformity with which they were painted and by the 
constant effort to tie the plastic realization of the painting to a specific, even unique, experience. In the absence 
of his individual reflexes, these unique references — no matter how neutral — seem less and less in accord with 
the generalized nature of his austere, flat painting style. 

Throughout the decade, Gleizes tried to reconcile the meaning of life and the universality of painting 
with the particular image, the source of each work's visual idea. Extending and clarifying his older value 
distinctions about subjects, he concluded during the twenties that a painting which dwelled wholly on essential 
rhythms (an object total in itself) was more universal and therefore superior to a painting which retained 
reminiscences of subjective, individual perception. Thus, although still life, derived from a specific and limited 
subject, had little universality, any reasoned construction — even an imaginary still life — was more ideal and 
hence represented a higher reality. Gleizes was approaching abstraction conceptually rather than visually and 
his intricate dialectic caused him, in 1924, to produce two amusing paintings which departed from his usual 
subject matter: the Imaginary Still Lifes, Blue and Green. In effect, Gleizes would have inverted Courbet's 
"Show me an angel and I will paint you an angel" to be "As long as an angel remains an unembodied ideal 
and cannot be shown to me, I'll paint it."' 

These years, during which Gleizes developed his consistent liierarchy of values, also witnessed 
critical changes in the artist's life. By 1919 the unity of the Cubist movement, the pre-war sense of common 
effort, had been totally shattered. Paris was dominated by a strong reaction against those dreams of revolu- 
tionary construction and common effort which Gleizes continued to cherish, while the avant-garde was char- 
acterized by the anarchic and, to him, destructive spirit of Dada. 26 Neither alternative held any appeal for 
him and, with the Salons once again dominated by conservative painters 2 ^, his old hostility to the city was 
constantly nourished. Although supported by Archipenko and Braque, an attempt to revive the spirit of the 
Section a"Or failed. Similarly, an effort to organize an artists' cooperative received the support of Delaunay, 
but of no other major painters. 

Gleizes, although he had enjoyed considerable prestige both as a man and a painter, gradually be- 
came alienated from the Paris art world. Like the ideal protagonists in a Henry James novel, he and Madame 
Gleizes had enough independent income to pursue their goals without bowing to material considerations, 
remaining unfettered by the realities that made such heavy demands on many other artists. The Gleizes spent 
more and more time in the country, at Serrieres, Madame Gleizes' family home, or at Cavalaire, then an even 
quieter spot on the Riviera. Becoming involved with people more sympathetic to his social ideas28 ? he was 
active in the Union Intellectuelle and lectured extensively in France. Germany. Poland and England. He 
continued to write and in 1924 the Bauhaus. (where certain ideals analogous to his own were practiced) 
requested a new book on Cubism 2 ^ 

Gleizes' ideals of a social art. so severely contradicted by the epoch, were nonetheless constant and 
in 1927, he founded the commune of Moly-Sabata, a second Utopian colony idealistically related to the Abbaye 



26 See Gleizes, "L' Affaire dada", Action, Paris, no. 3, April, 1920, pp. 26-32. Reprinted in English in Robert Motherwell, 
ed., Dada Painters and Poets, New York, 1951, pp. 298-302. 

27 Gleizes painted an ironic — and naturalistic — canvas of bathers in 1919, entitling it Homage to the Salon d'Automne. 

28 Between 1920 and 1926 Gleizes and Charles Henry became close friends and intended to write a book together on Art 
and Science. See Gleizes, "Charles Henry et fe Vitaiisme", in Cahiers de I'Etoile, Paris, no. 13. Januaiv-Februarv, 1930, 
pp. 112-128. 

29 Albert Gleizes, Kubismus, Bauhausbiicher 13, Munich, Albert Langen Verlag, 1928. 



24 



de Creteil. Obstinately refusing to recognize practical difficulties, Gleizes established this miniature society 
deliberately to counterbalance the centripetal pressures of modern life. Into this venture he poured energy, 
money and all his hope. Planned as a community of artists who were to support themselves by artisan produc- 
tion and agriculture, Moly-Sabata did manage to survive until 1951, although for many years — especially 
during World War II — it functioned almost purely because of the remarkable dedication of an Australian 
woman named Anne Dangar.30 The relatively long life of Moly-Sabata was due more to the strength of her 
commitment than to the general workability of such a semi-agrarian scheme at a time of greater and greater 
centralization and industrialization. 

Concurrent with the establishment of Moly-Sabata, where art was created as a metier and where 
craftsmanship, agriculture and other activities were placed within the rhythm of daily life, Gleizes embarked 
on a systematic examination of the art forms of other cultures. In his book La Forme et VHistoire, Celtic, 
Romanesque and Oriental forms particularly were studied for their innate and unselfconscious presentation 
of what he considered to be the fundamental basis of human life. From these studies he concluded that all 
form derived from human movement, from the kinesthetic sense of man in space, and that all human activity 
bred form. Architecture was the supreme plastic activity, for it was the most spiritual and socially organized. 
The natural cadence of life had never been expressed more fruitfully than in Romanesque art, where painting 
and sculpture were so naturally adjusted to architecture, and that period was to Gleizes a dazzling ideal. 
Consciously drawing on traditions that he recognized to be Xllth century. Gleizes exposed himself not only 
to the exhaustion of his financial resources in Moly-Sabata but also, more cruelly, to the charge of extreme 
reaction. Unfortunately, Moly-Sabata's program of "a return to the earth" later became one of the principal 
slogans of Marshal Petain's Vichy government and this ironic mental association, coupled with the Gleizes' 
long-standing (and intensely sincere) pacifism and work for European unity, eventually led to an understand- 
able bitterness among those who were active in the French resistance. 

For a time, in 1928-29, his own painting suffered. One suspects that although this was partly due 
to a lack of practice it also resulted from a too literal search for the rhythms of the Romanesque (seen in a 
group of religious paintings related to his studies of Autun and St. Savin) and the practical needs of an ideal: 
he wanted walls to decorate. A completely non-objective 1924 mural project 31 had been rejected because it 
was incomprehensible. Similarly, his murals for the church of St. Blanche de Serrieres, in spite of the icono- 
graphy depicting the Descent from the Cross, were again rejected as incomprehensible. The Church he so 
admired could not see the spiritual values of his curves and planes! Indeed, only once did he get an op- 
portunity to realize a large religious mural and it came only in 1951 when he was too old to do much of the 
execution himself. In a pediment high above the altar in the Jesuit Chapel of Les Fontaines at Chantilly, 32 
Gleizes' design for the Eucharist ironically concedes more iconography in title than in specific form. 

In La Forme et VHistoire, Gleizes had subordinated iconography to plastic activity and as he resumed 
almost feverish painting activity in 1931 his energies were absorbed in the large abstract Paintings for 
Contemplation. His relatively brief plunge into Scholasticism had naturally strengthened his old hierarchy 
of values but the key to his entire effort is found in his illustrations for Blaise Pascal's Pensees. Executed in 
1949-50, toward the end of Gleizes' fife, these etchings deliberately reviewed bis entire artistic and human 
career. The Pensees have for centuries provided philosophical insights into almost all of the ultimate problems 
of life: the sufficiency of reason, the verifiability of experience, the plausibility of revelation, the exercise of 
free will. It is perhaps the noblest effort in Western literature to reconcile faith with reason, to reconcile 
significant human activity with the eternity of Catholicism. 



30 Originally a painting student of Gleizes', Miss Dangar under his influence became a superb potter, a true disciple of his 
social ideafs and a sincere extension of his artistic consciousness, adapting his art to ceramics and participating selflessly — 
often under heartbreakingly difficult material conditions — in the rural community fife of Isere. 

31 For the Ecole du Pharmacie, Paris. 

32 See Albert Gleizes, "L'Esprit de ma f'resque 'L'Eucharistie'", V Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, March, 1953. 



25 






It is from these etchings that we learn the titles of Gleizes' first Painting for Contemplation, (no. 
147). a horizontal composition in which the circular movements of earlier more sensual works are reconciled 
with the austere manner characteristic of his painting of the twenties. From the Pascal we can also trace 
Gleizes' intellectual iconography, the meanings that he attached to other works. Thus, the nature of the 
central element in the Painting with Seven Elements (no. 151) is revealed as a variation on the theme "Gran- 
deur of Man", (see no. 177). Furthermore, the complex development of Gleizes' attitude toward perception 
and unique experience is traced through works like the 1914—19 circus theme pictures, which in Pascal are 
divertissements. Reprises of these paintings are juxtaposed «~ith Pascal texts that demonstrate why man can- 
not remain idle, for he then falls into a melancholy helplessness, realizing his own misery. 

Above all. in the Gleizes illustrations to Pascal, we find a conscious explanation for the painter's 
final style change which, in the mid-thirties, gradually allowed the austere matte surfaces to metarnorphize 
into an exuberant freedom of application and reintroduction of brushwork. even while keeping the sense of 
structure and control achieved by his earlier ascetic discipline. The result is the most lyrical work of the 
artist's career. \^ ith the reintroduction of fluid parallel brushstrokes, serving the double function of texture 
and cross-rh> thms. his paintings of the late thirties point toward the perfect ease, the lyricism of his last 
paintings. This development is sequential both visually and in terms of Gleizes' intellectual growth. 

His post-Cubist style of the twenties — flat, forthright, uncompromising — is virtually Pascal's 
"Spirit of Geometry". His style of the late thirties, matured in the Meditation series of the forties, is Pascal's 
"Spirit of Finesse", the product of a nimbly discerning mind. The first is reason and the second is faith, 
originally in opposition to each other but ultimately reconciled. 

The "Spirit of Geometry" (exemplified by Pascal's mathematical approach and Gleizes' ascetic 
period) is coolly reasoned. In painting, the shapes are intellectually, if also elegantly, arranged and they 
represent the structural principles of reality manifest in the solution of pictorial problems. The "Spirit of 
Finesse", however, as in the Paintings for Meditations (see especially no. 168). produces shapes that have 
opened, like a rose relaxing into bloom, creating fullness, grace and a more liquid movement which suffused 
the picture plane. In his final paintings Gleizes surrendered pure reason to the back of his consciousness and 
returned (with delight) to the pleasures of paint. Paint was his faith and theory was Iris reason: and after years 
of struggle, the two could coexist, complementing and nourishing each other. 

Gleizes' individual development, his unique struggle to reconcile forces, made him one of the few 
painters to come out of Cubism with a wholly individual style, undeflected by later artistic movements. Al- 
though he occasionally returned to earlier subjects (for example, in 1943 he did a new version of the Compo- 
sition with Seven Elements), these later works were treated anew, on the basis of fresh insights. He never 
repeated his earlier styles, never remained stationery, but always grew more intense, more passionate. 

Albert Gleizes is perhaps the only painter of our century to have consciously struggled between 
the demands of reason and faith, in a reasonable — indeed a brilliant — manner and finally to have come down 
on the side of faith. Like PascaL it is possible to regard him as an apologist for intellectual orthodoxy but it 
is also possible to regard him as a lucid sceptic who consistently demonstrated that no firm decisions are 
possible in any area of human activity. He was a metaphysician in an age that wanted not only to reject meta- 
physics but to deny the relevance of its unanswerable questions. For Gleizes, such a denial was equivalent to 
denying the grandeur of Man. His life ended in 1953 but his paintings remain to testify to his willingness to 
struggle for final answers. His is an abstract art of deep significance and meaning, paradoxically human even 
in his verv search for absolute order and truth. 



CATALOGUE 



Except for certain works which are juxtaposed beside the final 
versions to which they relate, entries in this catalogue are chrono- 
logical. References to literature and exhibitions under each heading 
are abbreviated, and may be found in detad in the documentation 
section which follows the catalogue. 



VIEW OF PARIS TOWARD MONTMARTRE. 1901. 
(VUE DE PARIS VERS MONTMARTRE). 
Oil on canvas, 21 x 25i" (53,5 x 65 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 1901". 
Lent by Rex de C. Nan Kive.ll, London. 

An interest in epic subject matter, here the modern city set in sur- 
rounding countryside, was already manifest in 1901, the first year 
that Gleizes began to paint seriously. Although clearly related to 
Pissarro in technique, the particular point of view as well as the 
composition and conception of this canvas is a departure from the 
style of late Impressionism. The density- with which it is painted 
and its solid framework suggest affinities with Pointdlism which 
were often noted by early critics. 



THE M\RKET AT COURBEVOIE. 1905. 

(LE MARCHE A COURBEVOIE). 

Oil on canvas, 21 i x 25+" (54 x 65 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 05". 

Lent by Musee des Beaux-Arts, Lyon. 

Exhibitions: Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Paris, 1906, 

no. 565. 

Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 2. 
Literature: Albert Gleizes: Hommage. Lyon, 1954, p. 127. 

derotjdille, R. "Albert Gleizes au Musee de Lyon", 

Bulletin des Musees de Lyon, no. 1, 1956, p. 11. 

Gleizes' affinity with Pissarro was particularly marked in scenes of 
city life. 



THE BRIDGE OF NEUILLY IN THE RAIN. 1901. 

(LE PONT DE NEUILLY). 

Oil on canvas, 21 x 25+" (53,5 x 65 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1901". 

Lent by Commandant Georges Houot, La Fleche, France. 

In one of several night scenes executed between 1901 and 1903, 
Gleizes balances bis concern for social activity with a study of 
atmosphere and motion. 



6. THE CHURCH NEAR THE ABBEY OF CRETEIL. 1908. 
(L'EGLISE, SOUVENIR DE L'ABBAYE DE CRETEIL). 
Ink, 133 x 11" (34 x 28 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1908 L'Eglise, l'Ab- 
baye de Creteil 1908". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 

The taut surface of this drawing, completed just before the dissolu- 
tion of the idealistic Abbaye, possibly results from a reworking in 
the early forties. 



3. THE MARKET AT ABBEVILLE. 1903. 
(LE MARCHE D'ABBEVILLE). 
Oil on canvas, 281 x 23+/' (73 x 60 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes, Abbeville, 1903". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 1. 

During his years of military service in Picardy and the north, 
Gleizes' style again moved closer to Impressionism. 



PICARDY (PAYSAGE PICARD). 1904. 

Oil on canvas, 21+ xl8" (54,5 x45,5 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Albert Gleizes, Picardie, 1904". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Although Gleizes became increasingly concerned with light and color 
effects, his early interest in views over enormous distances never- 
theless continued. 



CHURCH AT CRETEIL (EGLISE A CRETEIL). 1908. 

Oil on canvas, 551 x 40" (141 x 101,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1908". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibition: Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 10. 

The landscapes from the Creteil period show an increasing concern 
for solidity, a much broader handling of the paint, and a careful 
balancing of rhythms, foreshadowing what would develop into one 
of Gleizes' paramount concerns. The man in the foreground is 
probably Dr. Morinaud, later the subject of The Man on the Bal- 
cony (no. 32). 



CANAL BOATS ON THE SEINE. 1908. 
(PENICHES SUR LA SEINE). 
Oil on canvas, 21 i x 25i" (54 x65 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r.-"Albert Gleizes 1908". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



27 



Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 13. 
Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 4. 

Unraodelled areas of bright color appear in a 1903 Still Life of 
Flowers (in his sister's collection at La Fleche), but Gleizes does not 
seem to have explored these possibilities further until early in 1908 
when works such as this show affinities to Fauve painting. 



PARIS FROM THE SEINE (BORD DE RIVIERE). 1908. 
Oil on canvas, 21i x25i" (54 x65 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 08". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 4. 
Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 5. 

Gleizes' Fauve-like period was brief, lasting only a few months, and 
even when his paint was thickest and color brightest, his concern 
for structural rhythms and simplification was dominant. 



By treating the sky in geometric terms and by modifying curves to 
become sharper, slightly angled lines, Gleizes began to hold his 
compositions consistently to the surface plane. His awareness of 
Cezanne is here more evident, even in the handling of paint. 



14. PARIS (LES QUAIS). 1908. 
Ink, 12 xl6+" (30,5x42 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 08". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



Preliminary drawing for no. 15. 



15. PARIS (LES QUAIS). 1910. 

Oil on canvas, 21 x25i" (53,5 x65 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1910". 

Lent by Professor and Mrs. Milton Handler, New York. 

Provenance : George Moos, Geneva. 



10. LANDSCAPE IN THE PYRENEES MOUNTAINS. 1908. 
(PAYSAGE DANS LES PYRENEES). 
Oil on canvas, 20J x25+" (53 x65 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "A. Glezies 1908". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Gift, Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris, 1963. 
Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 2 (as 

Paysage a, la couleur simplifiee). 

Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 3. 

Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 12. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 7. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 3. 

Gleizes spent several summers in Gascony where he painted this 
key work in which the process of geometric simplification (more 
akin to Pont Aven and Nabi principles than to Cezanne) is well 
advanced. The painting also bears a marked affinity to the work of 
Le Fauconnier, although the two artists had not yet become friends. 



He converted older drawings (no. 14) into new paintings, sub- 
ordinating his former concern for social activity to his fresh interest 
in construction. Here, an overall rose tonality was employed to 
counter the illusion of depth. 



16. HOUSES AMONG TREES. 1910. 

(MAISONS DANS LES ARBRES). 

Oil on canvas, 44J x60|" (113,5 xl54 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1910". 

Lent by Madame Alb Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Exposition Universelle, Lyon, 1914. 

Pictures by Crotti, Duchamp, Gleizes, Metzinger, 
Montross Gallery, New York, 1916, no. 29. 

In this work, Gleizes attempted to consolidate his recent advances 
with the older Picardy landscape theme (no. 4), in order to find the 
underlying principles that organize a vast scene. 



11. DONKEY CARTS. 1908. 

(CHARETTES A BAGNERES DE BIGORRE). 
Watercolor, 9i x 123" (24 x 32,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 08 B. de. B." 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin, Philadelphia. 



12. LANDSCAPE NEAR BAGNERES DE BIGORRE. 1909. 
(ENVIRONS DE BAGNERES DE BIGORRE). 

Ink, 11 xl7" (28 x43 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes pres de B. de Bigorre 09" 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



17. BY THE SEINE (BORD DE LA SEINE, MEUDON). 
Pencil and ink, 9i xl2i" (23,5 x31 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 09". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 



18. ROAD, TREES AND HOUSES. 1910. 
(ENVIRONS DE MEUDON). 

Pencil, crayon and watercolor, 9i x 12 i" (23,5 x31 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "A. Gleizes 1910". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 



1909. 



During his 1909 trip to Gascony, Gleizes concentrated exclusively 
on landscape, reducing the forms of nature to primary shapes. 



13. WALLED CITY (VILLE FORTIFIEE). 1909-10. 
Oil on canvas, 21i x 25i" (54 x 65 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Alb Gleizes". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Siegfried Ullmann, Palm Beach, Florida. 
Provenance: Private Collection, Wisconsin. 
Andre Emmerich, New York. 



19. THE TREE (L'ARBRE). 1910. 

Oil on canvas, 36 x28i" (91,5 x72,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 10". 

Private Collection, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Salon des Independents , Paris, 1910, no. 2160. 

Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 34. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U. Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 33. 

Trente Ans d'Art Independant, Grand Palais, Paris, 

1926. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 6. 



28 



Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 2. 
Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 
1953, no. 35. 

Depuis Bonnard, Musee National d'Art Moderne, 
Paris, 1960-61. 

Von Bonnard bis Heute, Haus der Kunst, Munich, 
1961. 
Literature: Albert Gleizes, 50 Ana, Lyon, 1947, pi. 2. 

gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 

p. 208. 

habasque, G. Cubism, Geneva, 1959. 

In this work, one of Gleizes' most important paintings of the crucial 
year 1910, we see the artist's volumetric approach to Cubism and 
his successful union of a broad field of vision with a flat picture 
plane. Earlier studies, such as nos. 17, 18, clearly anticipate this 
development. 



20. PORTRAIT OF R. G. [LEIZES]. 1910. 
Oil on canvas, 55i x44" (140 xll2 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 10". 
Private Collection, Paris. 
Literature: gleizes, a. Tradition et Cubisme, Paris, 1927, p. 32. 



The effort to grasp the intricate rhythms of a panorama resulted in 
a comprehensive geometry of intersecting and overlapping forms 
which created a new and more dynamic quality of movement. 



23. LANDSCAPE AT MEUDON (PAYSAGE, MEUDON). 1911. 
Oil on canvas, 57j x45i" (147 xll5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1911"; on reverse: "Paysage, 
Albert Gleizes, 1911". 

Lent by Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Les Independants, Brussels, 1911, no. 88, (as Le 

Chemin). 

Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 39. 

Paintings from the Musee National d'Art Moderne, 

Paris, American circulating exhibition, 1957-58. 
Literature: dorival, b. The School of Paris in the Musee d'Art 

Moderne, New York, 1962, p. 148, ill. 

golding, j. Cubism, London, 1959, pp. 150-159. 

Man is reintroduced, but subordinated to the heroic concept of 
landscape which simultaneously comprehends the close and the 
distant, the earth's curve, the sun, even the force of wind against 
trees. 



In his Souvenirs Gleizes wTote of the debt he owed to Le Faucon- 
nier, especially to the 1909 Portrait of P. J. Jouve. In 1910, Gleizes' 
painting of his uncle, Robert, and Le Fauconnier's Portrait of Paul 
Castiaux, the co-editor of Les Bandeaux d'Or, show these two 
artists working in strikingly similar styles (cf. figs. 1, 2, p. 15). 



21. WOMAN WITH PHLOX (LA FEMME AU PHLOX). 1910. 
Oil on canvas, 31 J x39+" (81 xlOO cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 10". 
Lent by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York. 
Exhibitions: Salon des Independants, Paris, 1911, no. 2612. 

Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 35. 

International Exhibition of Modern Art (The 

Armory Show), New York, Chicago, Boston, 1913, 

no. 195. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 5. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 4. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 37. 

Twentieth Century Masters, Marlborough Gallery, 

London, 1955, no. 21. 

Albert Gleizes, Marlborough Gallery, London, 1956, 

no. 8. 
Literature: gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 

p. 208. 

golding, J. Cubism, London, pp. 150-151. 

Continuing his new interest in the figure, Gleizes strove to manip- 
ulate a genre subject with the same sobriety and broad scale that 
had always informed his landscapes. Thus, exterior nature is here 
brought into a room and the distant vista seen through the window 
is formally resolved with a corresponding interior shape. 



24. PORTRAIT OF MADAME BARZUN. 1911. 
Oil on canvas, 39 x28", (99 x71 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 1911". 
Lent by Jacques Barzun, New York. 
Exhibition: Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949. 
Literature: gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 
p. 207. 

Begun in the spring, this portrait was never finished, for after the 
summer Gleizes realized that his intervening stylistic development 
made it impossible to complete the portrait in a homogeneous style. 



25. SKETCH FOR "PORTRAIT OF JACQUES NAYRAL". 1910. 
(ETUDE POUR NAYRAL). 
Ink, 20x15" (51 x38cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 10", inscribed "2eme des etudes 
pour le portrait de Jacques Nayral, expose au Salon d'Automne 
1911". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



26. SKETCH FOR "PORTRAIT OF JACQUES NAYRAL". 1911. 
(TETE DE NAYRAL). 
Oil on canvas, 25i x21i" (65 x54 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 11". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Art Contemporain, Paris, 1911, no. 36. 

Galerie Dalmau, Barcelona, 1912, no. 17. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 8. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 6. 



22. LANDSCAPE (PAYSAGE). 1911. 

Oil on canvas mounted on board, 28 x36i" (71 x91,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 11". 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Morton G. Neumann, Chicago. 
Exhibition: Galerie Dalmau, Barcelona, 1912, no. 16, (frontis- 
piece). 



27. PORTRAIT OF JACQUES NAYRAL. 1911. 
Oil on canvas, 70 J x51i" (180 xl30 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1911". 
Lent by Commandant Georges Houot, La Fleche, France. 
Exhibitions: Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1911, no. 609. 

Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 38. 



29 



Les Maitres de V Art Independant, Petit Palais, Paris, 
1937, no. 17. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National a" Art Moderne, Paris, 
1953, no. 64. 

II Bienal, Sao Paulo, 1953, no. 16. 
Literature: gleizes, a. "L'Epopee", Le Rouge et le Noir, Octo- 
ber, 1929, p. 64. 

apollinaire, G. L 'Intransigeant, October 10, 1911. 
(cf. Chroniques d'Art, 1960, p. 199). 

In 1910 Gleizes began this portrait of his old friend, Jacques Nayral, 
the young author-dramatist who two years later married Mireille 
Gleizes. Nayral, a partisan of the synthetic-social ideas of the 
Abbaye, was editor-in-chief for the publishing house of Figuiere, 
and directly responsible for the publication of Gleizes and Metzin- 
ger's Du Cubisme as well as for Apollinaire's Les Peintres Cubistes 
and the projected series Tous les Arts. This work, in which the 
background shows Gleizes' Courbevoie garden, stylistically fulfills 
the direction established in the unfinished portrait of Mme. Barzun. 



28. THE HUNT (LA CHASSE). 1911. 

Oil on canvas, 48i x38i" (123 x98 cm.). 

Signed l.r. "Albert Gleizes". 

Lent by Edouard Labouchere, Paris. 

Provenance : Rene Jaffe, Brussels. 

Exhibitions: Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1911, no. 610. 

Jack of Diamonds, Moscow, 1912. 

Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 37. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 64 bis. 

Les Soirees de Paris, Galerie Knoedler, Paris, 1958, 

no. 13. 

Les Chefs d'Oeuvres des collections privees francaises, 

Haus der Kunst, Munich, 1961, no. 51. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 5. 
Literature: apollinaire, g. L' Intransigeant, October 10, 1911. 

(cf. Chroniques d'Art, 1960, p. 199). 

granie, j. "Au Salon d'Automne", Revue d Europe 

et d'Amerique, Paris, October, 1911. 

Cahiers d 'Albert Gleizes, Lyon, 1957 (frontispiece). 

dorival, B. Les Peintres du XXe siecle, Paris, 1957, 

p. 76. 

Here Gleizes not only created a synthetic landscape, in which ele- 
ments are placed in unreal but symbolic relationships to each other, 
but also created a synthesis of social experience, showing two 
distinct types of human use of the land. Le Fauconnier painted a 
similar subject the following year. Dorival has suggested that the 
treatment of the horses may well be an important source for those 
of Duchamp-Villon in 1914. 



29. THE KITCHEN (LA CUISINE). 1911. 
Oil on canvas, 46 J x37l" (118,5 x94,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes". 
Lent by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York. 
Exhibitions: Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 36. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U. Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 34. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 7. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 3. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 64 ter. 

Marlborough Gallery, London, 1956, no. 9. 



XIX and XX Century European Masters, Marlbo- 
rough Gallery, London, 1957, no. 44. 
Literature: gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 
p. 208. 

gleizes, a., "L'Epopee", Le Rouge et le Noir, Octo- 
ber, 1929, p. 71. 

This painting is derived from a 1909 brush and ink drawing titled La 
Menagere in the Musee des Beaux-Arts, Lyon. The drawing, 
emphasizing curvilinear patterns, is an important link in Gleizes' 
development from symbolist-derived forms to the volumetric 
Cubism of this work. It is particularly interesting to see the adapta- 
tion of an earlier subject to the structural style of 1911. 



30. THE BATHER (BAIGNEUSE). 1912. 

Oil on canvas, 24 xl5" (61 x38 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 12". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis Winston, Birmingham, Michigan. 

Provenance: Earl Stendahl, Hollywood, California. 
Theodore Schempp, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Moderne Kunst Kring, Amsterdam, 1912, no. 113. 
Societe Normande de Peinture Moderne, Rouen, 
1912, no. 92. 

Winston Collection, The Cranbrook Academy of 
Arts Museum, 1951. 

Winston Collection, University of Michigan Museum, 
1955. 

The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis Win- 
ston, Detroit, Institute of Arts, Virginia Museum of 
Art, San Francisco Museum of Art, The Milwaukee 
Art Institute, 1957-58, no. 45. 

This study, developed in connection with the large Bathers (no. 31), 
is related to a 1910 painting. Nude, (present whereabouts un- 
known) and represents an effort to fuse classical subjects to new 
methods. 



31. THE BATHERS (LES BAIGNEUSES). 1912. 

Oil on canvas, 41i ■ 67" (105 xl70 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 1912". 

Lent by Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Salon des Independants , Paris, 1912, no. 1347. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U. Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 36. 

Trente Ans d'Art Independant, Grand Palais, Paris. 

1926, no. 1057. 

Les Createurs du Cubisme, Paris, 1935, no. 31. 

Les Maitres de I'Art Independant 1895-1937, Petit 

Palais, Paris, 1937, no. 6. 

Literature: apollinaire, g. Le Petit Bleu, March 20, 1912 (cf. 
Chroniques d'Art, 1960, p. 230). 
bonfante, e. and Ravenna, j. Arte Cubista con "les 
Meditations Esthetiques sur la Peinture" di Guil- 
laume Apollinaire, Venice, 1945, no. LVIII. 
Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Catalogue- 
Guide, Paris, 1961. 

In The Bathers (as in Delaunay's City of Paris, 1912 and, to a lesser 
extent, in Metzinger's Meudon Landscape, 1913), certain elements 
from modern industrial life are sharply contrasted with the classical 
presence of the nudes, yet the relationships are formally resolved. 
This optimistic reconciliation of traditional harmony with con- 
temporary life was an aspect of simultaneity that was of particular 
concern to the Passy group of Cubists. 



30 



32. THE MAN ON THE BALCONY. 1912. 

(L'HOMME AU BALCON). 

Oil on canvas, 77 x4Si" (195 xll5 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 12". 

Lent by Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Louise and Walter 

Arensberg Collection. 

Provenance : Arthur Jerome Eddy. 
Walter C. Arensberg. 

Exhibitions: Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1912, no. 689. 

International Exhibition of Modern Art (The Ar- 
mory Show), New York, Chicago, Boston, 1913, no. 
196. 

Literature: eddy, a. j. Cubists and Post Impressionism, Chicago, 
1914. 

wright, w. H. Modern Painting, Its Tendency and 
Meaning, New York, London, 1915. 
ozenfant and jeanneret. La Peinture Moderne, 
Paris, 1924, p. 93. 

gleizes, A. "L'Epopee", Le Rouge et le Noir, Octo- 
ber, 1929, p. 68. 

Philadelphia museum or art. Arensberg Catalogue, 
1954, pi. 92. 
golding, j. Cubism, London, 1959, p. 161. 

This second portrait of Dr. Morinaud, probably from his office on 
Avenue de l'Opera, shows Gleizes again giving prominence to the 
curvilinear elements that had been important in his style in 1907-09. 
The painting became the subject of a lively debate between Mari- 
netti and Lhote. (La Vie des Lettres et des Arts, no. 16, 1922, p. 10,) 
in which the Futurist leader insisted that a Futurist painter would 
have attempted to "give the ensemble of visual sensations capable 
of being experienced by the person on the balcony". Lhote replied 
that such preoccupations were "literary" and "psychological", and 
outside the interests of the French Cubists. He was wrong for, 
although not primarily concerned with the reality of visual sensa- 
tions, Gleizes was, nevertheless, deeply committed to symbolic and 
psychological relationships. 



33. sketch for "harvest threshing". 1912. 
(Etude pour "le depiquage des moissons"). 

Oil on board, 20 x25i" (51 x65 cm.). 

Signed l.r. "Albert Gleizes". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Josefowitz, New York. 

Provenance: Mme. P. de Cugio, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, no. 43 bis. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U., Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 37. 



34. HARVEST THRESHING (LE DEPIQUAGE DES MOISSONS) 
1912. 

Oil on canvas, 106 xl38j" (269 x353 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes, 1912". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 
Exhibitions: Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 43. 

Trente Ans d'Art Independant, Paris, 1926, no. 1058. 
Literature: hourcade, o. Paris-Journal, October, 1912. 

Les Beaux-Arts, Paris, August, 1938, p. 2, ill. 

gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 

p. 208. 

golding, j. Cubism, London, 1959, pp. 160-161. 



This work, with Delauney's City of Paris, is the largest and most 
ambitious Cubist painting undertaken up to this point (1912). It 
summarizes Gleizes' interests, presenting an epic panorama of 
mountains, valleys, clouds and smoke, towns, workers and wheat, 
a simultaneous celebration of the harvest, nature and man in 
idealistic harmony. The painting is Gleizes' parallel to Le Faucon- 
nier's Abundance, and it seems likely that it takes its theme not 
merely from the social and synthetic program of the Abbaye de 
Creteil, but specifically from the long poem of Henri Martin Barzun, 
La Montagne, poeme legendaire, the 5th part of La Terrestre Tra- 
gedie (Paris, Mercure de France, 1908): "Les Moissonneurs dans les 
Epis, armes de faux et de faucilles..." (pp. 49-56). 



35. CHARTRES CATHEDRAL. 1912. 

(LA CATHEDRALE DE CHARTRES). 

Oil on canvas, 28£ x23£" (72,5 x60 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 12". 

Lent by Stadtische Galerie im Landesmuseum, Hannover. 

Provenance: Mme. F. Picabia. 

Exhibitions: Societe Normande de Peinture Moderne, Rouen, 

1912, no. 93. 

Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 42 (as The 

Church). 

Cezanne till Picasso, Moderna Museets Vanner, 

Stockholm, 1954, no. 146. 

The cathedral had a special fascination for many French Cubists, 
not only because of its admirable architecture but because of the 
social and historical synthesis which resulted from its context as the 
focal point of an otherwise modern town. 



36. THE PORT (LE PORT). 1912. 
Pencil, 6x71" (15 xl9cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 12"; on reverse, "Dessin pour le 
tableau Un Port 1912 qui appartient a Madame Duchamp-Villon 
Rue Lemaitre a Puteaux (Seine) No. 2". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



37. THE PORT (LE PORT MARCHAND). 1912. 
Oil on canvas, 35i x45j" (90 x 116,5 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Albert Gleizes 12". 

Lent by The Art Gallery of Toronto, Gift from the Junior Women's 
Committee Fund, 1955. 
Provenance: Raymond Duchamp-Villon. 

Madame Lignieres Duchamp-Villon. 

Sidney Janis Gallery, 1954. 
Exhibitions: Salon des Independants, Paris, 1913, no. 1294. 

Galerie Berthe Weill, Paris, 1913, no. 1. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U., Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 43. 

Exhibition of Cubism (period 1910-13), de Hauke 

and Company, New York, 1930, no. 12. 

Le Cubisme, 1907-1914, Musee National d'Art 

Moderne, 1953, no. 87. 

II Bienal, Sao Paulo, 1953, no. 17. 
Literature: art gallery of Toronto, Painting and Sculpture, 

1959, p. 57. 

The Port, also a popular Neo-Impressionist subject, was another 
characteristic theme appropriate to the interests of the Passy 



31 



Cubists. The word on the hull of the center ship is probably the first 
time lettering appeared in a Gleizes painting, perhaps due to the 
influence of Picasso and Braque, but in this case, the foreignness of 
the word "King" reinforces symbolic associations of the Port, an 
international commercial center. 



38. LANDSCAPE (PAYSAGE). 1912. 

Oil on board, 14i \17i" (37,5 x43,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 12". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance : from the artist, 1938. 

Exhibitions: Moderne Kunst Kring, Amsterdam, 1912, no. 114. 
Cubism, Arts Club of Chicago, 19.55, no. 36. 

With this work (actually the mouth of a river) Gleizes again takes up 
themes from his earliest paintings. 



39. PASSY (BRIDGES OF PARIS). 1912. 
Oil on canvas, 22J x28i" (58 x72,5 cm.). 
Signed 1.1. "Albert Gleizes". 
Lent by Museum des 20. Jahrhunderts, Vienna. 
Provenance: Sidney Janis Gallery, New York. 
Exhibitions: Salon de la Section d'Or, Paris, 1912, no. 41. 

Societe Normande de Peinture Moderne, Rouen, 

1912, no. 91. 

Der Sturm, Berlin, July, 1914. 

Kunst von 1900 bis Heute, Museum des 20. Jahr- 
hunderts, Vienna, 1962, no. 58. 
Literature: gleizes and metzinger. Du. Cubisme, Paris, 1912, 

p. 105. 

apollinaire, G. Paris- Journal, 1914, (cf. Chroniques 

d'Art, 1960, p. 405). 

golding, J. Cubism, London, 1959, p. 158. 

A synthesis of the modern city with its smoke, river and steel 
bridges, this work probably refers also to the spirit of solidarity 
among the newly formed "Artists of Passy". In this sense it indi- 
cates an awareness of factions within Cubism. 



40. THE FOOTBALL PLAYERS. 1912-13. 
(LES JOUEURS DE FOOTBALL). 
Oil on canvas, 89 x72" (226 xl83 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 1912-13". 
Private Collection, New York. 
Provenance: Collection Dalmau, Barcelona. 
Exhibitions: Salon des Independants, Paris, 1913, no. 1293. 

Erster Deutscher Herbstsalon, Berlin, 1913, no. 147. 

Galerie Dalmau, Barcelona, 1916. 
Literature: apollinaire, g. L'Intransigeant, Salon des Indepen- 
dants, 1913, March 18, 1913, (cf. Chroniques d'Art, 

Paris, 1960, p. 292). 

Montjoie, no. 4, March 29, 1913, reproduction of 

drawing for Football Players. 

azoaga, e. El Cubismo, Barcelona, 1949, no. 41. 

The role of team sport, especially in the context of mass audience 
participation, reflects another interest of the artists of Passy. 
Jacques Nayral was occasionally a sports writer (cf. V Action Nou- 
velle, February 25, 1914) and a fan (as was Delaunay) of foot and 
bicycle racing. Gleizes' Football Players dates from the same year as 
Delaunay"s Cardiff Team. 



41. THE METRO (LE METRO). 1912. 
Oil on canvas, 15 x 18" (38 x 46 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Alb Gleizes". 
Lent by Rex de C. Nan Kivell, London. 
Exhibition: Galerie Berthe Weill, Paris, 1913, no. 3, (as La Gare). 

Embodying as it did the modern realities of speed and decreased 
distance (hence simultaneity), the railroad, treated in plastic terms, 
was a logical subject for Gleizes. Although less heroic than Delau- 
nay's Hommage to Bleriot, it is symptomatic of an essential over- 
lapping interest shared by these men. 



42. PORTRAIT OF THE PUBLISHER FIGUIERE. 1913. 
(PORTRAIT DE FIGUIERE). 
Oil on canvas, 56i x40i" (143 xl02 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 13". 
Lent by Musee des Beaux-Arts, Lyon. 
Exhibitions: Salon d'Automne, 1913, no. 768. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U., Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 47. 

Les Maitres de V Art Independant 1895-1937, Paris, 

1937, p. 94, no. 16. 

Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 12. 

Galerie des Garets, Paris, 1947, no. 1. 

Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 4. 

he Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 119. 

Les Sources du XXe Siecle, Musee National d'Art 

Moderne, Paris, 1961. 

Exposition d'Art Francois 1840-1940, National Mu- 
seum of Western Art, Tokyo, 1961-62, no. 366. 
Literature: salmon, a. "Le Salon d'Automne", Montjoie, nos. 

11-12, 1913, pp. 3-5. 

allard, r. Les Ecrits Francois, 1913, p. 3. 

gleizes, a. Kubismus, Munich, 1928, pi. 9. 

cogniat, R. and george, w. Roger de la Fresnaye, 

Paris, 1949, p. 40. 

deroudille, R. Bulletin des Musees Lyonnais, 1956, 

no. 1, p. 12. 

Vincent, M. Catalogue du Musee de Lyon, 1956, 

p. 315. 

rosenblum, R. Cubism and Twentieth-century Art, 

New York, 1960, no. 117. 

Eugene Figuiere, head of his own publishing company, strove to be 
identified with every modern development. In this portrait which 
Salmon admired for its "fine and most adroit psychology", he is 
surrounded by his publications which were written by Gleizes' 
friends: Mercereau, Georges Polti, Apollinaire, Metzinger. Paid 
Fort, Gustave Kahn, Henri Martin Barzun and Jacques Nayral. 



43. MAN IN A HAMMOCK (L'HOMME AU HAMAC). 1909. 
Sepia ink over pencil, 12+ xl6" (32 x40,5 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "A. Gleizes". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes. Paris. 



44. MAN IN A HAMMOCK (L'HOMME AU HAMAC). 1913. 
Pentil and ink, 7 J x6i" (20 x 16 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, 1913". 
Lent by Y\ alter Firpo, Marseilles. 



32 







33 







34 




10 



35 






19 



37 




38 




21 



39 




40 




22 



41 




23 



42 




24 





43 




27 



44 





45 




46 




47 




34 



48 




i 




49 




39 



50 




40 



51 





41 




52 



45. MAN IN A HAMMOCK (L'HOMME AU HAMAC). 1913. 

Oil on canvas, 5H x6H" (130 xl55,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 13". 

Lent by Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Buffalo. 

Exhibitions : Modern! Umeni, S.V.U., Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 41. 
Der Sturm, Berlin, July, 1914. 

Literature: apollinaire, g. Paris-Journal, July 4, 1914. (cf. 
Chroniques d'Art, 1960. p. 405). 
gleizes, A. "L'Epopee", Le Rouge el le Noir, Octo- 
ber. 1929. p. 81. 

This painting presents an interesting synthesis of back and forth 
motion and introduces a composition based on the intersection of 
powerful diagonals. It goes back to a number of related sources in 
addition to the drawings no. 43, 44. A large and finished painting of 
Man in a Hammock dating from the summer of 1909 is on the reverse 
of Houses among Trees 1910, (no. 16). In the pre-Cubist version 
and in a small oil sketch (once in the Ida Bienert collection, Dres- 
den), the man wears a large sombrero. 



46. THE CITY AND THE RIVER. 1913. 
(LA VILLE ET LE FLEUVE). 
Ink, 7ix6i" (19,5x16 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1913 La Ville et le 
Fleuve". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 

This drawing (see fig. 3, p. 18) is the only presently known record of 
one of Gleizes' most important works, The City and the River, 
which combined in a large canvas all his attitudes toward the 
modern city: its location in landscape, its establishment and life on 
the bank of a river. An oil sketch, once in the Graf collection, 
Stuttgart, unfortunately has also disappeared. 



47. SEWING WOMEN (FEMMES COUSANT). 1913. 
Oil on canvas, 73 x49i" (185,5 xl26 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 13"'; on reverse "A. Gleizes les 
femmes qui cousent". 

Lent by Rijksmuseum Kroller-Muller, Otterlo. 
Provenance: Herwarth Walden, Berlin, 1913. 

Blumenfeld, Berlin, with Komter, Amsterdam. 

Komter sale, Maks, Amsterdam, January 24, 1922. 
Exhibitions: Der Sturm, Berlin, 1913. 

Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover-Dusseldorf, 1928, 

no. 65. 

Volksuniversiteit, Rotterdam, 1949. 

Sous le Signe d : Apollinaire, Verviers, Ghent, Brus- 
sels, 1950, no. 18. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 20. 
Literature: raynal, m. Anthologie de la Peinture en France, 

Paris, 1927, p. 159; English edition, New York, 

p. 212. 

gleizes, A. Tradition et Cubism, Paris, 1927, pi. 5. 

The artist's mother and two sisters were the models for this work. 
The treatment of faces and hands shows the close relationship be- 
tween the individual styles of Gleizes and Metzinger shortly after the 
publication of Du Cubisme. An oil sketch for the central head is in 
the collection of Dr. Kriegel, Lackawanna, New York. 



48. THE HARBOR, sketch for "FISHING BOATS". 1913. 
(LE PORT, etude pour "LES BATEAUX DE PECHE"). 
Watercolor, 25S xl9i" (64,5 x49 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1913". 
Lent by Nationalmuseum, Stockholm. 
Exhibition : Galerie Berthe Weill, Paris, 1913, no. 6. 



49. FISHING BOATS (LES BATEAUX DE PECHE). 1913. 
Oil on canvas, 65 x43j" (165 xlll cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 13". 
Lent by Madame Ferdinand Moller, Cologne. 
Provenance: Korner, Essen. 
Exhibitions: Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1913, no. 770. 

Moderni Umeni, S.V.U., Manes, Prague, 1914, no. 44. 

Der Sturm, Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 1961, no. 85. 

Europdische Kunst 1912, Wallraf-Richartz Museum, 

Cologne, 1962, no. 61. 
Literature: apollinaire. g. Ulntransigeant, November 14, 15, 

1913. (cf. Chroniques d'Art, Paris, 1960, pp. 337- 

339). 

kuppers, P. E. Der Kubismus, Leipzig, 1920, pi. 3. 

gleizes, A. "L'Fpopee", Le Rouge et le Noir, Paris, 

October, 1929, p. 69. 

dorival, B. Les Peintres du Vingtieme Siecle, Paris, 

1957, p. 97. 

Apollinaire called this painting the "glory" of the Salon d'Automne, 
1913. It recapitulates the artist's longstanding social concern for 
scenes of work as w 7 ell as his interest in night effects. 



50. DRAWING FOR "HEAD IN A LANDSCAPE". 1913. 
(ETUDE POUR "TETE D'HOMME"). 
Sepia ink, 4i x6i" (11 x 16,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1913". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New "iork. Gift of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Colin, 1964. 



51. HEAD IN A LANDSCAPE (TETE D'UN HOMME). 1913. 
Oil on canvas, 14i x 191" (38 x 50,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 13". 
Lent anonymously. 
Exhibition: Galerie Hans Goltz, Munich, 1913, no. 31. 

The work is probably a self-portrait. 



52. LANDSCAPE WITH BRIDGE. Circa 1912-13. 
(PAYSAGE AVEC UN PONT). 
Ink, 7 x5+" (18x14 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 1910-12". 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Lester Avnet, Kings Point, New York. 



53. LANDSCAPE (PAYSAGE). 1913. 

Oil on canvas, 35J x28}" (91 x72,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 13". 

Lent by Ferdinand Howald Collection, The Columbus Gallery of 
Fine Arts, Ohio. 

Provenance: John Quinn, New \ork, 1927. 
Ferdinand How-aid. 



53 



One of a number of small paintings from 1912-13 involving the 
theme of the bridge, this suburban landscape relates to the back- 
ground of Sewing Women (no. 47) and the preparatory drawing 
(no. 52). 



54. LANDSCAPE WITH WINDMILL. 1913. 
(PAYSAGE AVEC MOULIN). 
Oiljjn canvas, 38} x3H" (98,5 x79,5 cm.). 
Signed 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 13". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Altschul, New York. 
Provenance: Suillerot, Paris. 
Exhibition : Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, 

1960, no. 103. 
Literature: apollonio, u. Fauves and Cubists, New York, 1959, 

p. 67. 

Concentrating more on effect, the power of wind, harnessed for 
man's use, rather than on the object, this painting contrasts with 
a slightly earlier variant once in the Jacques Villon collection. 



STUDY FOR "PORTRAIT OF IGOR STRAVINSKY". 1914. 

(ETUDE POUR STRAVINSKY). 

Ink, 10ix7i" (26x20 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Etude Stravinsky, Paris, Juki, 

1914, Alb Gleizes". 

Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 



58. TWO WOMEN IN FRONT OF A WINDOW. 1914. 
(FEMMES ASSISES DEVANT UNE FENETRE). 
Oil on canvas, 44i x57" (13,5 x45 cm.). 
Signed and dated "Alb Gleizes 14". 
Lent by Pedro Vallenilla Echeverria, Caracas. 
Provenance: John Quinn, 1927. 

Pierre Matisse. 
Exhibition: Carroll Galeries, New York, 1915, no. 31. 
Literature: The John Quinn Collection, Huntington, New York, 

1926. 

The artist's mother and sister once again are seen from the interior 
of the Courbevoie house where the arabesque against the window 
recalls the grille motif first expressed in the 1909 drawing for The 
Kitchen, now in Lyon. 



59. SKETCH FOR "THE CITY". 1914. 
(ETUDE POUR "LA VILLE"). 
Ink, 10+ x8" (27x20 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 14". 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Zacks, Toronto. 

There is another version of this drawing in the Leffert collection. 
New York. Both are the basis for one of Gleizes' rare early etchings, 
and are preliminary notations for the 1914 painting The City, 
formerly in the Quinn collection, now in a private collection, 
Chicago. 



56. PORTRAIT OF IGOR STRAVINSKY. 1914. 
Oil on canvas, 51i x45i" (130 x 114,5 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1914, Igor Stra- 
vinsky". 

Lent by Richard S. Zeisler, New York. 
Provenance: Madame Frigerio, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Montross Gallery, New York, 1916, no. 35. 

Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 5. 

UOeuvre du XXe siecle, Musee National d'Art Mo- 

derne, Paris, 1952. 

Twentieth Century Masters, Marlborough Gallery, 

London, 1955. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 171. 
Literature: degand, l. Art d'Aujourd'hui, Series 3, no. 5, June 

1952, p. 24. 

"Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, nos. 6-7, 

January. 1952, p. 31. 

For the Portrait of Stravinsky there exist half a dozen pen and ink 
studies, such as no. 55, as well as a large oil sketch which bears the 
inscription, "Etude pour Stravinsky, Petroushka, Theatre de 
Champs-Elysees". Gleizes had followed the development of modern 
music since his association with Albert Doyen at the Abbaye. 



57. TWO WOMEN IN FRONT OF A WINDOW. 1914. 
(FEMMES ASSISES DEVANT UNE FENETRE). 
Gouache, 18i x21i" (47,6 x54 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1914". 
Lent by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York. 
Exhibition: Marlborough Gallerv, London, 1956, cat. no. 46. 



60. MONTREUIL LANDSCAPE. 1914. 
(PAYSAGE DE MONTREUIL). 
Oil on canvas, 28i x 36i" (73 x 92 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 14". 
Lent by Saarland-Museum, Saarbriicken. 
Provenance: Nell Walden. 

Stuttgarter Kunstkabinett, 1954. 
Exhibitions: Sammlung Nell Walden, Galerie Flechtheim, Berlin, 

1927, no. 75. 

Wege abstrakter Malerei, Galerei Gunther Franke, 

Munich. 1929-30, no. 12. 

Der Sturm, Kunstmuseum. Bern. 1911 1 5, no. 284. 

Expressionisten, Kunsthaus. Zurich, 1945, no. 38. 

Sammlung Nell Walden, Kunsthalle, Basel, 1953, 

no. 237. 

Der Sturm, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, 1954, no. 26. 

Exposition Verkannte Kunst, Kunsthalle. Reckling- 
hausen, 1957, no. 55. 

Der Sturm, Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 1961, no. 86. 

Among the last of Gleizes' pre-war suburban landscapes, this canvas 
should be compared with the Landscape, no. 53, to demonstrate 
that although he continued to deal with deep space and wide vistas, 
he did so with a marked reduction of specific references to reality. 



61. STUDY FOR "WOMAN AT THE PIANO". 1913. 
(ETUDE POUR "FEMME AU PIANO"). 
Watercolor. 10! x8i" (27 x21 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Louise and Walter 
Arensberg Collection. 

Literature: Philadelphia museum of art. Arensberg Catalogue, 
1954, pi. 93. 



54 



62. WOMAN AT THE PIANO (FEMME AU PIANO). 1914. 
Oil on canvas, 57| x45i" (146.5 xll5,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 14". 

Lent by Philadelphia Museum of -Art. The Louise and ^ alter 
Arensberg Collection. 

Exhibitions: Carroll Galleries, New York, 1915, no. 30. 
Literature: rosenblum, r. Cubism and Twentieth Century Art, 
New York, 1960, no. 118. 
Philadelphia museum OF art. Arensberg Catalogue, 1954, pi. 94. 

This painting of one of his sisters playing the piano in the house at 
Courbevoie is an important source for the first Portrait of Florent 
Schmitt (no. 70). 



63. THE 14th OF JULY (LE 14 JUILLET). 1914. 
Ink. 153 *12i" (40 x31 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1914: Dessin pour Le 
14 Juillet". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 

In terms of picture construction, sketches such as this for the un- 
finished 14th of July are of critical importance, for their rhythms 
anticipate Gleizes' vital theory of translation and rotation. They 
culminated in a gouache, (sold from the Gleizes exhibition, Galerie 
des Garets, 1947, whereabouts unknown) because the projected 
painting was barely underway when war broke out in 1914. 



64. STUDY NO. 2 FOR "PORTRAIT OF AN ARMY DOCTOR". 
(ETUDE 2 POUR "MEDECIN MILITAIRE"). 1915. 
Ink, 7+ x 6" (19 x 15 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes Toul 15": on reverse "No. 2 
Etude pour Medecin Militaire Toul 1915". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist. 1938. 



65. STUDY NO. 7 FOR "PORTRAIT OF AN ARMY DOCTOR". 
(ETUDE 7 POUR "MEDECIN MILITAIRE"). 1915. 
Ink with crayon, 9i x 7i" (25 x20 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes Toul 1915": on reverse "7 Etude 
pour Medecin Militaire Toul 1915". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



Literature: ozenfant and jeanneret. La Peinture Moderne, 
Paris, 1924, p. 118 (reproduced showing 1914-15 
date). 

"Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, nos. 6-7, 
January, 1952, pp. 32-33. 

At least eight studies survive for this majestic portrait of Professor 
Lourbet of Nancy. Painted at the fortress city of Toul, late 1914— 
early 1915, it began to fuse circular rhythm (see the treatment of the 
shoulders) to the estabbshed composition based on intersecting 
diagonals, (see cat. nos. 45, 47). 



68. MY FRIEND THfiO M. (MON AMI THEO M.). 1914. 
Watercolor, 18 xl4" (46 x35,5 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes Mon ami Theo M. 
Toul 1914". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



69. WATERCOLOR FOR "CITY OF TOUL". 1915. 
(AQUARELLE POUR "U\ YILLE DE TOUL"). 
Watercolor, 8± xlOi" (21,5 x26 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 15". 
Lent by Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Rafel, South Orange, New Jersey. 

The Moselle river, spanned by a bridge, dominates the lower part of 
this composition, one of several studies for two 1915 paintings of the 
City of Toul. The first of these, in the Bourdon collection, Paris, is 
an echo of the City and the River theme. The second, (exhibited 
Marlborough, London, 1956, no. 11) converts the subject into 
powerful circular rhythms, akin to nos. 72, 73, 75. 



PORTRAIT OF FLORENT SCHMITT. 1914-15. 

Oil on canvas, 79 x60" (200 xl52 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes Toul 14, 15". 

Lent by Josefowitz Collection, Geneva. 

Provenance: Bourdon, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Montross Gallery, New York, 1916, no. 41 (as The 

Man at the Piano). 

Galerie des Garets, Paris, 1947, no. 2. 

Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 6. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, 

1953, no. 172. 

77 Bienal, Sao Paulo, 1953, no. 18. 



66. ARMY DOCTOR (MEDECIN MILITAIRE). 1914. 
Gouache, 6 x 7i" (15 x 19 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes Toul 14". 
Lent bv Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Fuller, New York. 



Florent Schmitt, an important French composer, w r as stationed at 
Toul with Gleizes. This large portrait marks the beginning of an 
attempt to preserve specific and individual visual characteristics 
while experimenting with a radically different compositional treat- 
ment in which broad planes, angled from the perimeter, meet 
circles. The source for such a method is found in the drawings for 
the 14th of July, (no. 63). 



67. PORTRAIT OF AN .ARMY DOCTOR. 1914-15. 
(PORTRAIT D'UN MEDECIN MILITAIRE). 
Oil on canvas, 47 i x37i" (120 x95 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, Toul 1914". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1937. 
Exhibition: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 8. 



71. PORTRAIT OF FLORENT SCHMITT, THE SONG OF WAR. 
(PORTRAIT DE FLORENT SCHMITT. CHANT DE GUERRE). 
1915. 

Oil on canvas, 39i x 39i" (100 x 101 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes; Chant de Guerre, 
Toul 1915, a F. Schmitt". 



55 



73. 



Lent by Musee National d'Art Modeme, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Montross Gallery, New York. 1916. no. 47. 
Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 16. 
Tate Gallery. London, 1956. 
La Musique, Besancon, 195.. 
Apollinaire, Palazzo Barbarini, Rome, 1960. 
Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 14. 

Literature: dorival, b. The School of Paris in the Musee Natio- 
nal d'Art Modeme, New York 1962. p. 262. ill. 

The Song of War realized the fusion sought in the first portrait of 
Florent Schmirt and successfully integrated schematic indications 
of the composer into the overall whirl of the composition. 



COMPOSITION. 1915. 

Oil on canvas, 38i x35i' (97 x91 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 15". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: L 'Art Abstrait, St. Etienne, 1957, no. 59 (pi. 25). 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 11. (frontispiece). 
Literature: Albert Gleizes: Hommage, Lyon, 1954, pi. 1. 

This work, based on The Song of War, is Gleizes' first abstract com- 
position. In it a total balance of planes and circular movement is 
achieved, the painter carefully building his forms in logical transi- 
tions from the square of the canvas. A students version of this 
painting later decorated the exterior wall of his studio in St. Remy- 
de-Provence. 



COMPOSITION. 1915. 
Oil on canvas, 40 x35i' (101,5 x90 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 15". 
Lent by Madame Henri Benezit, Paris. 

Literature: seuphor, m. Dictionary of Abstract Painting, New 
York, 1957, p. 179. 

This complex painting is based on compositional problems related 
to nos. 71 and 72. 



the subject for one of Gleizes' rare still life paintings. (Throughout 
his life Gleizes was deeply attached to the principles of artisanship.) 
Several studies, among them no. 74, preceded this work. 



THE PARISIENNE. PORTRAIT OF JULIETTE ROCHE. 

(LA PARISIENNE). 1915. 

Oil on canvas, 24+ xl4l" (61,5 x36,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. ""Alb Gleizes 15". 

Lent by Musee des Beaux- Arts, Lyon. 

Exhibitions: Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 7. 

Galerie Bern", Avignon, 1950, no. 1. 
Literature : vrxcEXT, m. Catalogue du Musee de Lyon, 1956, p. 316. 

Juliette Roche, noticing the word "Julie" on a ship in The City and 
the River at the 1913 Salon d Autonrne, had arranged through her 
friend Canudo to be taken to Gleizes' studio. During the first year 
of the war they corresponded and in September, 1915 they were 
married. 



77. NEW" YORK. 1915. 

Gouache and ink, 26 x20" (66 x51 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1915 New York". 

Lent bv Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



COMPOSITION (FOR ""JAZZ") (POUR ""JAZZ"). 1915. 

On on board, 28 J x28i" (73 x73 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 15 N.Y.". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. New \ ork. 

Provenance : Feragil Gallery, New 1 ork, 1938. 

Literature: The Literary- Digest, Sew- York, November 27, 1915, 

p. 1225. 

Gleizes was tremendously impressed by New \ork City but the 
earliest New York paintings continued without break the formal 
research advanced at Toul (nos. 71-75) even though the influence 
of new subject matter is apparent. In a photograph first published 
in the Xeic York Herald, later reprinted in The Literary Digest, 
October 27, 1915, he can be seen at work on this painting. 



74. THE LORRAINE PITCHER. 1914. 
(LA CRUCHE LORRAINE). 
Watercolor, 12 x8" (30,5 x20,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes, Toul, 14". 
Lent by The Los Angeles County Museum, Mr. and Mrs. W ilham 
Preston Harrison Collection. 



THE LORRAINE PITCHER. 1915. 

(LA CRUCHE LORRAINE). 

Oil on canvas, 40 x40" (101,5 x 101,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 15". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Rothschild, Kitchawan. New York. 

Exhibitions: Bourgeois Galleries, New \ork, 1916, no. 14. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New \ork, 1937, no. 10. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 6. 

Searching for subjects appropriate to his new interests in circu l a r 
movement, Gleizes found a typical Lorraine vase, a long jar with as 
many as four circular handles attached to its neck. This traditional 
form, whose possibilities had been explored for centuries, became 



79. JAZZ ILE JAZZ). 1915. 

Oil on board, 39f x29+" (100 x75 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes New York 1915". 

Lent by Rene Deroudille, Lyon. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Berry, Avignon, 1950, no. 2. 

Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 15 (as Banjo). 
Literature: deroudille, r. i 4 Soli, no. 2, 1955, pp. 6-7. 

Jazz again exploits circular movements in combination with broad 
tilting planes, incorporating the specific gestures of the two players 
into an inner framework that points clearly to the style of the 20 s. 



80. CHAL POST. 1915. 

Gouache with oil on board, 39i x30" (101 x76 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes New York 1915"". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. New "i ork. 

Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 

Exhibition: Montross Gallery, New York, 1916, no. 36. 

Literature: Albert Gleizes: Hommage, Lyon, 1954. pi. 2. 



56 



81. KELLY SPRINGFIELD. 1915. 

Gouache with oil on board, 39s x30" (101 x76 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes N.Y. 15"". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. New York. 

Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 

Exhibitions: Montross Gallery, New \ork, 1916, no. 37. 

Gleizes was fascinated by the signs of New \ ork, especially those 
painted across windows read in reverse from the interior. 



82. BROADWAY. 1915. 

Oil on board, 38* x30" (98,5 x76 cm.). 

Signed 1.1. "Albert Gleizes"-. 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. AltschuL New York. 

Provenance: Dalmau. Barcelona. 

Exhibition: \ale University Art Gallery-, New Haven, I960, no. 

104. 
Literature: Literary Digest. New York. November 27, 1915. 

The initial American reaction to Gleizes might be typified by a 
letter about this painting published in Literary Digest on December 
3, from Mr. W. E. Bolles in Detroit, Michigan: "... Among the 
mass of indicated characteristics of Broadway, such as skyscrapers, 
great newspapers, rapid transit, etc. a person with a vivid imagina- 
tion can see... in the grouping of these elements the face of a 
prosperous, well-fed, well groomed keen minded business man..." 
A related study, developed from the strong diagonals, is in the 
Howald collection at the Columbus Gallerv of Fine Arts. 



a3. BROOKLYN BRIDGE. 1915. 

TtiI- and gouache, 9i >: 7*" (25 x 19 cm.). 

On reverse: "Albert Gleizes Brooklyn Bridge 1915". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

The first of Gleizes" Brooklyn Bridge drawings, this work is a study 
for the 1917 oik no. 86. 



84. BROOKLYN BRIDGE. 1915. 

Oil and mixed media on canvas, 40i x40i" (102 x!02 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1915 Brooklyn Bridge". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: John Quinn, (Sale, 1927). 

J. B. Neumann, 1944. 
Exhibitions: Montross Gallery, New York, 1916, no. 40. 

Cubism and Abstract Art, Museum of Modem Art, 

New York, 1936, no. 88. 

Contemporary Movements in European Painting, 

Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio, 1938, no. 40. 
Literature: Literary Digest, November 27, 1915, p. 1225 (visible 

in photograph of Gleizes). 

SEtPHOR, M. L Art Abstrait, Paris, 1950, p. 146. 

ROSESBLOl, R. Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art, 

New York. 1960. 



85. BROOKLYN BRIDGE. 1915. 

Oil with sand on board, 59 x47i" (150 xl20 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes New York 1915". 
Lent by Madame P. de Gavardie, Paris. 
Exhibition : Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 10. 

This second oil version of the Brooklyn Bridge is totally abstract, 
its dominant patterns derived from the criss-cross of intersecting 
supporting cables. This work marks Gleizes' first use of sand on a 
pictures surface and signals a period of experimentation with new 
painting techniques. 



ON BROOKLYN BRIDGE (SLR BROOKLYN BRIDGE). 1917. 

Oil on canvas, 63 i >51" (162 x 129,5 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed 1.1. "Albert Gleizes New \ork 1917 sur 

Brooklyn-Bridge" . 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New \ ork. 

Provenance: from the artist. 1937. 

Exhibitions : The Brooklyn Bridge, The Brooklyn Museum, New- 
York, 1958. 

Literature: gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 
p. 208. 

This third and last oil version, related most closely to the 1915 
drawing (no. 83), attempts to synthesize the City under the symbol 
of the Bridge. Lnified by whirling circles, the composition shows 
both ends of the bridge with the river below and buildings of Man- 
hattan and Brooklyn beyond. Gleizes and Joseph Stella had been 
friends since 1915 and it is interesting to compare this painting 
with Stella's Brooklyn Bridge of 1917-1918, painted somewhat later. 



THE ASTOR CLP RACE (FLAGS). 1915. 

(LE PRIX ASTOR CLP 01 LES DRAPEAUX). 

Gouache with oil on board, 39i x29i" (99,5 x74 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 15 N.Y.". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New "i ork. 

Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 

Exhibitions: Montross Gallery. New York, 1916, no. 39. 

The gay motif borrowed from the races was later incorporated into 
the second version of Clowns, 1917. at the Musee d'Art Modeme de 
la \ ille de Paris. Despite the exuberance realized here, however, a 
note of deep irony is struck for the numbers 8 and 6 are those of 
his dead friend Nayxal's regiment in the French Army. (See no. 98). 



OVERLAND. 1916. 

Oil on canvas, 31i x25+" (81 x65 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1916". 

Lent by Galerie L. Bourdon, Paris. 

Exhibitions : Montross Gallery, New \ ork, 1916, no. 48. 

Le Cubisme, Musee National d'Art Modeme, Paris, 

1953. no. 38. 



The Bridge, which appears in elevation in Chal Post (no. 80) is here 
synthesized into a dizzying structure in which a cityscape is seen 
through the great swing and intersecting patterns of the cables 
which dominate the canvas surface. In the first interview- given after 
his arrival in America, Gleizes stated his admiration for the Brook- 
lyn Bridge, comparing it to the noblest achievements of European 
architecture. 



89. TOWARD NEW YORK. 1916. 
(IMPRESSION DE NEW YORK). 
Ink. 17 ■ 13i" (43,5 x33,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 16, N.Y.". 
Lent bv Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



57 





Tk . 



49 



58 







47 



59 









m ■^m i 



51 




62 



60 




54 



61 




62 




63 




67 



64 






73 



66 




72 



67 




75 



68 





76 



78 




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88 



70 





80 



81 



71 





72 




73 





74 



90. study for "downtown". 1916. 
(Etude pour "downtown"). 

Gouache, 24} x 18 J" (63 x48 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1916 New York" ; on reverse "Alb 
Gleizes. 16 N.Y. No. 16) New York 1916 Etude. Gouache pour 
'Downtown' New York. La peinture a l'huile appartient a le Gug- 
genheim Foundation". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



96. 



with circular motion. This specific method of picture construction 
was (theoretically) formulated by Gleizes several years later, be- 
tween 1920 and 1923. 



CLOWNS. 1916. 

Oil on board, 29i x25" (75 x63 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 16". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibition : Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 16. 



91. TARRYTOWN. 1916. 

Gouache, 24i x 18}" (62,5 x47,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes Terrytown 1916 N.Y."; on 

reverse "No. 17) Aquarelle gouache 'Terrytown' N.Y. 1916 Pas de 

tableau". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 

Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 

This is clearly preliminary to no. 92, despite the artist's inscription. 



92. COMPOSITION (TARRYTOWN). 1916. 
Oil on canvas, 36 J x29i" (93,5 x74,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, 16"; on reverse a painting of 
1920: Woman in Front of a Window. 
Lent by Messrs. Kennedy-Garber, New York. 

In his attempt to organize in plastic terms the abstract equivalent 
of his earlier broad panoramas, Gleizes reverted to the tilting planes 
reminiscent of smaller ones in such volumetric cubist works as The 
Hunt and Jacques Nayral, both of 1911 (nos. 28, 27). 



93. NEAR NEW YORK (ENVIRONS DE NEW YORK). 1915. 
Gouache and ink, 251 x 19}" (65 x 50 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed 1.1. "Albert Gleizes, 1915, Terrytown, 
N.Y.". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



94. HEAD OF A CLOWN (TETE DE CLOWN). 1915. 
Ink, 7}x7i" (19,2 xl8,2 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed I.e. "Alb Gleizes Toul 1915 Etude pour 
Tete de Clown". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Freeman, New York. 
Provenance : Rose Fried, New York. 
Royal Marks, New York. 

This is actually a portrait of the artist Georges Valmier, who was in 
Gleizes' regiment at Toul. 



The circus theme interested Gleizes for several years, appearing in 
pre-war Paris works (no. 119, for example) and continuing through 
1920, (no. 120). We also know a second version of this painting 
from 1917, (see comment for no. 87). 



97. TO JACQUES NAYRAL (A JACQUES NAYRAL). 1914. 
Gouache, 16 xl2" (40,5 x30,5 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 14; Jacques NayTal 
tue a La Bossee, 1914". 

Lent by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York. 
Exhibition: Gleizes, Marlborough Gallery, London, 1956, no. 45. 

Gleizes first learned of the death of his brother-in-law and friend 
when a postcard on which he had written "Patience, a little more 
patience, it is impossible that this war can endure much longer... 
then we will put ourselves back to work..." came back marked 
"disparu". 



TO JACQUES NAYRAL (A JACQUES NAYRAL). 1917. 
Oil on board, 30 x23}" (76 x60 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes 17, a Jacques Nayral". 
Lent by Leonard Hutton Galleries, New York. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1954, no. 9. 
Les Peintres Cubistes, Galerie Suillerot, Paris, 1963. 

This is a private portrait, an intensely personal memorial to his 
closest friend, a key figure who shared the hopes of the pre-war 
Passy group for a collective artistic program. 



99. STILL LIFE WITH FLASKS. 1916. 
(NATURE MORTE AUX FLACONS). 
Ink, 10 J x8i" (27,5 x21,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes Barcelone 1916"; on reverse 
"Dessin a la plume pour 'Nature morte aux flacons' Barcelone 1916 
le tableau app. a Alb Gleizes". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



95. HEAD OF A CLOWN (TETE DE CLOWN). 1914-17. 
Oil on canvas, 46 x38" (117 x96,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Albert Gleizes 1914-17". 
Lent anonymously. 
Exhibitions: Ardsley Studios, New York, 1919, no. 8. 

Les Maitres de V Art Independant 1895-1937, Petit 

Palais, Paris, 1937, no. 20. 

Developed from studies begun at Toul in 1915 (see no. 94), this 
painting displays Gleizes' characteristic fusion of tilting planes 



Preliminary drawing for no. 100. 



100. STILL LIFE WITH BOTTLES. 1916. 

(NATURE MORTE AUX BOUTEILLES). 

Oil on board, 18} xl3}" (46 x35 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 16"; signed and dated 1.1 

"Albert Gleizes, Barcelone, 1916". 

Lent by Dr. Jules Vache, Lunel, France. 

Exhibition: Galerie Berry, Avignon, 1950, no. 4. 



75 



Gleizes rarely painted still lifes, his epic interests usually finding 
sympathetic echos in more inclusive themes. His earliest Cubist 
still life, dating from 1912, formerly in the Weimar Museum, is un- 
fortunately lost and a second of 1915 relates to this Barcelona work. 
Apart from The Lorraine Pitcher (no. 75), he made no more until 
1924. 



105. BERMUDA STUDY (LES BERMUDES).. 1917. 
Watercolor and pencil, 11 x8£" (28 x22 cm.). 
Signed and dated I.e. "Alb Gleizes 17"; on reverse "Aquarelle pour 
Paysage, la maison du Gouverneur . . . Bermuda 1917. le tableau ap- 
partient a Stieglitz, N.Y.". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



101. JEAN COCTEAU. 1915. 

Gouache, 22 xl5i" (56 x40 cm.). 

Signed and dated I.e. "Albert Gleizes, Jean Cocteau 1915". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibition: Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 13. 



106. BERMUDA STUDY (LES BERMUDES). 1917. 

Watercolor and gouache over crayon, 113- x 9i" (30 x24 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, Etude Bermudes 17". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 



Gleizes and Cocteau, who was later a witness at Gleizes' marriage, 
first became friends during their collaboration on an unrealized 
production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. This would have been 
the first Cubist stage production and Gleizes was to design the 
costumes and Andre Lhote the sets. It was to be performed at the 
Cirque Medrano in the summer of 1915, but, because of the war, 
this proved impossible. All of Gleizes' costume drawings are in the 
collection of the Musee des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. 



107. THE GOVERNOR'S HOUSE, BERMUDA LANDSCAPE. 1917. 
(UA. MAISON DU GOUVERNEUR). 
Oil on board, 35* x27i" (89,5 x70 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1917". 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Altschul, New York. 
Provenance : A. Stieglitz, New York. 

H. D. Walker, Minneapolis. 
Exhibition: Loan Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine 
Arts, 1920. no. 45. 



102. PORTRAIT OF JEAN COCTEAU. 1916. 

Oil with plaster on canvas, 45 J x31i" (116 x80 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Albert Gleizes, Barcelone, 16 Jean 

Cocteau". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Siegfried Ullmann, Palm Beach, Florida. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Dalmau, Barcelona, 1916. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 11. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 7. 
Literature: goth, m. 391, no. 1, Barcelona, January 25, 1917. 



Returning to America early in 1917, the Gleizes' left almost im- 
mediately for Bermuda, where they stayed about two months. The 
effect of Bermuda's mild weather, lush foliage and pastel colors 
directly influenced Gleizes' style, which became unusually sensuous. 
These paintings seem removed from the complex formal and in- 
tellectual concerns which Gleizes had already begun to deal with. 
The parallel brushstrokes indicate also a temporary return to a 
Cezannesque technique. 



In this portrait, painted in Barcelona, Gleizes treated Cocteau in the 
same vein as their Shakespeare project. Although he carries a 
basket of fruit, (as did Ariel who produced the grand banquet at the 
end of the Tempest) the costume also relates to the Red Cross 
uniform worn by Cocteau during the war. Such an interpretation 
would be in agreement with the generally symbolic tenor of Gleizes' 
thinking. 



103. DANCER (DANSEUSE). 1916. 

Oil and gouache, 101 x8i" (26 x20,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, Barcelone 16". 
Lent by Dr. Henry M. Roland, London. 



108. BERMUDA DRAWING (LES BERMUDES). 1917. 
Pencil and watercolor, 10J x8J" (27,5 x21,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "A. Gleizes 17". 
Lent by Galerie Moos, Geneva. 



109. BERMUDA SCENE (PAYSAGE DES BERMUDES). 1917. 
Oil on canvas, 32 x25i" (81 x64,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 17". 
Collection Romanet. Paris. 
Provenance: Pierre Faure. 
Exhibitions: Bourgeois Galleries, New York, 1917. 

Les Createurs du Cubisme, Les Beaux-Arts, Paris, 
1935. 



104. SPANISH DANCER (DANSEUSE ESPAGNOLE). 1916. 
Oil with sand on board, 39J x30i" (101 x76,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 16". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New \ork. 
Provenance: Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, New \ork, 1937. 
Exhibitions: Bourgeois Galleries, New York, 1917, no. 29. 

Ardsley Studios, New York, 1919, no. 3 (west room). 

The brief Barcelona period produced a host of similar paintings in 
which specific patterns and motifs were exploited in an effort to 
place the painting in the context of a precise encounter. 



A variant of this painting, with the composition reversed, is in the 
collection of the Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris. 



110. BARCELONA HARBOR (LE PORT DE BARCELONE). 1916. 
Mixed media on paper, 18i x23" (46,5 x58,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Barcelone. 1916 Albert Gleizes": on reverse 
"No 15) Aquarelle etude pour 'Un port', Barcelone 1916, Le 
tableau a l'huile appartient a le Guggenheim Foimdation, II a ete 
peint a New- York en 1917". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New \ ork. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



76 



111. HERE IN PORT (DANS LE PORT). 1917. 
Oil on board, 60$ x47i" (153 xl20 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes New York 1917". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York, 1937. 
Exhibition: Ardsley Studios, New York, 1919, no. 3. 

This work incorporates part of the harbor scene explored in the 
Barcelona study of 1916 (no. 110). An ink drawing in the collection 
of Madame Gleizes, executed between the Barcelona study and this 
painting, was preparatory to the upper part of this composition. 



Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Hilla Rebay, Green Farms, Connecticut. 

Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York, 1938. 

Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1941. 
Exhibitions: Salon des Independants, Paris, 1920, no. 1011. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 13. 
These subjects of On a Music Hall Singer, On a Vaudeville Theme 
and On a Circus Theme (collection Baltimore Museum of Art), gave 
rise to the concept of the subject as a "springboard" credited to 
Gleizes and elaborated by Walter Pach in his little monograph 
on Jacques Villon for the Societe Anonyme (New York, ca. 1924). 



112. STUNT FLYING (VOLTIGE AERIENNE). 1917. 
Oil with sand on board, 40 x29i" (101,5 x76 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 1917" ; on reverse " Voltige aerien- 
ne. New York, 1917, Albert Gleizes". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York, 1937. 
Exhibitions: Ardsley Studios, New York, 1919, no. 6 (west room). 

Salon des Independants, Paris, 1920, no. 1910. 
Literature: robbins, d. "Gleizes and Delaunay", Baltimore 

Museum of Art News, vol. XXV, no. 3, Spring, 1962, 

pp. 9-21. 

Although not the last painting of the circus theme, this is in many 
respects the culmination of Gleizes' treatment of the subject. 
Derived from a 1914 painting in the collection of Madame Gleizes 
where trapezists, audience and nets are clearly identifiable, this 
work is abstract, employing tilting planes and circular movement 
to express the essence of dynamic rhythm. 



116. STUDY FOR "BUILDING CONSTRUCTION". 1916. 
(DESSIN POUR "NAISSANCE D'UN BUILDING"). 
Ink and crayon, 9j x 7J" (25 x20 cm.). 

Signed and dated "Naissance d'un building New York 1916 Alb 
Gleizes"; on reverse "No 8) Dessin a la plume pour 'Naissance d'un 
building' New York 1916 Le tableau a l'huile doit etre dans une 
collection allemande II a ete vendu par Walden". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance : from the artist, 1938. 



117. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 1917. 
(NAISSANCE D'UN BUILDING). 
Oil on canvas, 40 x30" (101,5 x76 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 17". 

Lent by The Cincinnati Art Museum, Gift of Thomas C. Adler. 
Exhibition : Ardsley Studios, New York, 1919, no. 7. 
Literature: schoener, a. The Cincinnati Art Museum Bulletin, 
1956, pp. 18-22. 



113. STUDY FOR "ON A VAUDEVILLE THEME". 1916. 
(DESSIN POUR "SUR UN VAUDEVILLE"). 
Ink and pencil, 11 x 8i" (28 x21,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 'Vaudeville' Broadway N.Y. 
1916"; on reverse "Dessin a la plume pour 'Sur im Vaudeville', 
Broadway New York 1916 La peinture a Fhuile appartient a le 
Guggenheim Foundation". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



This work (and the preceding study for it) are Gleizes' final syn- 
thesis of New York. In it we see all the elements of his style of the 
1920's, combined with the sensuous paint handling which he 
renounced a few years later. 



118. ON THE FLAT IRON (SUR LE FUA.T IRON). 1916. 
Ink, 104 x8i" (27 x21 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "Alb Gleizes New \ ork Sur le Flat- 
iron 16". 
Lent by Herbert M. Barrows, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 



114. ON A VAUDEVILLE THEME (SUR UN VAUDEVILLE). 1917. 
Oil on board, 47+ x38i" (120,5 x98 cm). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes N.Y. 1917". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York, 1937. 

Based on the drawing no. 113, this work is also a return to an 
equestrian theme first treated in 1914 (no. 119) and relates to the 
circus series. 



119. SKETCH FOR "THE EQUESTRIAN". 1914. 

(ETUDE POUR "SUR UNE ECUYERE DE CIRQUE"). 

Crayon, 10! x8i" (27 x21 cm.). 

Signed, dated and inscribed l.r. "A. Gleizes Courbevoie 14". 

Lent by Augustin Terrin, Marseilles. 

This drawing furnished a departure point for an etching of the same 
year, as well as serving as the basis for a series of paintings. 



115. ON A MUSIC HALL SINGER. 1917. 

(SUR UNE CHANTEUSE DE MUSIC HALL). 

Oil on board, 40 x29i" (101,5 x75,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes. 17"; on reverse "Alb Gleizes 

No 17 sur une chanteuse de music hall New York 1917". 



120. THE EQUESTRIAN. 1919. 

(SUR UNE EQUYERE DE CIRQUE). 
Oil on canvas, 37i x29i" (95 x75 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, New York 19" 
Lent by Augustin Terrin, Marseilles. 



77 



Exhibitions: Ardsley Studios, New York, 1919, no. 2 (west room). 
Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 14. 

This is the penultimate version of the Equestrian which in 1914, 
(no. 119), had begun the circus pictures. The last version from 
1920 was reproduced in Ozenfant and Jeanneret's La Peinture 
Moderne, Paris, 1924, and is in the collection of the Musee National 
d'Art Moderne, Paris. Both works, as well as the study, relate not 
only to the Vaudeville theme (nos. 113, 114) but also to the On a 
Circus Theme in the Baltimore Museum. 



124. 



Most of Gleizes' pictures of the period, however, were "paintings 
without subject", explorations of plastic relations that concentrated 
on familiar visual problems of movement and depth. 



COMPOSITION. 1921. 

Oil on canvas, 47i x37" (20 .-94 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 21". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Literature: Abstraction-Creation, no. 3, Paris, 1934, p. 18. 



121. ALONG THE AVENUE (SUR L'AVENUE). 1920. 
Oil on canvas, 63i x50}" (162 xl29 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1920". 
Lent by Rudolf Indlekofer, Basel. 
Provenance: G. David Thompson, Pittsburgh. 
Exhibition: Der Sturm, Berlin, 1921. 

In Paris after the war, Gleizes retained specific themes from New 
\ork City as representative of the direction that modern collective 
life would pursue. Although his manner of composing did not 
change, he deliberately purged his art of all powerful touches of 
paint application in order to focus attention on the relationships 
among forms. He eliminated the dominating presence of his 
physical gesture because it was too individual, amounting — he 
thought — to an "aesthetic trick". Although eliminating sensuous- 
ness in his painted surface, Gleizes retained vibrant color and even 
began to make his own, often mixing pigments with gasoline. The 
result was an extremely fragile matte surface, forthright but, un- 
fortunately, highly susceptible to damage from moisture. Vi orks 
such as this found their most ambitious realization in the enormous 
mural sketch for the Gare de A/(oscow), now in the Grenoble 
Museum. 



122. WOMAN WITH BLACK GLOVE. 1920. 
(FEMME AU GANT NOIR). 
Oil on canvas, 49+ x39i" (126 x 100 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Albert Gleizes", dated 1.1. "1920". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Marlborough Gallery, London, 1956, no. 13 (as 

Femme Assise). 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 17. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 23. 
Literature: lake and maillard (ed.). Dictionary of Modern 

Painting, Paris, New York and London, 1956, p. 113. 

There are a number of small versions of this painting which illustrate 
one aspect of Gleizes' activity in the early 20's: reminiscences of 
specific reality evoked within the context of increasingly careful 
picture construction. 



123. COMPOSITION (TABLEAU). 1921. 

Tempera on panel, 36} x28j" (92 x73 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes, 1921". 
Lent by The Trustees of The Tate Gallery, London. 
Provenance: Leonce Rosenberg, Paris. 

James Wardell Power, Jersey, Channel Islands. 

Power Sale, Sotheby's, November 7, 1962, no. 17 

(as Abstraction). 
Literature: Bulletin de I' Effort Moderne, March, 1925, no. 13, 

pp. 8-9. 



Gleizes' reputation as an uncompromising practitioner of austere 
abstract art in 1921 brought him his first pupils, the Irish painters 
Mainie Jellett and Evie Hone. Obliged to clarify his methods for his 
students and for himself as well, he called the now characteristic 
tilting planes "translation" and the circular movements "rotation". 
Both compositional techniques can be traced back to about 1914 
(see no. 63). The developing theories were incorporated in his 
book La Peinture et ses lois, ce qui devait sortir du Cubisme, written 
in 1922. 



COMPOSITION WITH TWO NUDES. Circa 1922. 
(COMPOSITION AVEC DEUX NUS). 
Tempera on canvas, 47i x37" (120 x94 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 
Collection Lady Norton, London. 

Exhibition : Marlborough Gallery, London, 1956, no. 20. 
Literature: "Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, nos. 6-7, 
January, 1952. p. 35. 

In order to achieve what he called "supple movement", Gleizes 
organized his canvas by the guided movement of a chosen plane 
surface. Plane surfaces move back and forth, to right and left, 
progressing to more complex forms, so that curves were infused 
into the developing rhythm. 



OCTAGONAL COMPOSITION. Circa 1922. 

(COMPOSITION OCTAGONALE). 

Oil on canvas, 35i x27i" (89,5 x69,5 cm.). 

Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

This is an example of the principles of translation and rotation 
at work. A related drawing, the final illustration of La Peinture et 
ses Lois, when it was printed in La Fie des Lettres et des Arts 
(1923), was purchased by Larionov who presented it to the Museum 
of Western Art in Moscow. 



127. FOR A PAINTING ON A FAMILIAR THEME. 1923. 
(POUR UNE PEINTURE FAMILIERE). 
Gouache and watercolor, 9 x 7i" (23 x20 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, 23" ('?). 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 



128. COMPOSITION OCTOBER. 1922. 

Oil on canvas. 57+ x37i" (146 x94,5 cm.). 

Signed l.r. "Alb Gleizes": dated 1.1. "X BRE 1922". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Literature: gleizes. a. Tradition et Cubisme, Paris, 1927, pi. 10. 



126. 



78 



This painting relates to a 1923 painting entitled La Vieille Dame 
(Marlborough, London, 1956, no. 18, ill.) and both were inspired by 
a yellowed photograph of Madame Gleizes' grandmother found by 
Gleizes in the Roche family home at Serrieres. 



129. WHITE COMPOSITION. Circa 1922. 

(PEINTURE-OBJET A DOMINANTE BLANCHE). 

Oil on board, 36i x28i" (92 x73 cm.). 

Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Musee Calvet, 1962, no. 22. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 26. 

After two years of increasing austerity, Gleizes still occasionally 
indulged in an exuberant display of lively pattern. A 1920 drawing 
for this work is reproduced in J. Chevalier's Albert Gleizes et le 
Cubisme, Basel, 1961; a related gouache, entitled Three Themes, is 
in the collection of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and a 
large oil (present whereabouts unknown) was exhibited at the 
Gleizes exhibition, Der Sturm, 1921. 



134. IMAGINARY STILL LIFE, BLUE. 1924. 
NATURE MORTE IMAGINAIRE, BLEUE). 
Oil on canvas, 41 i x29i" (105,5 x74 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, 24". 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 
Exhibitions: 2eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1924. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 23. 

Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 20. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 13. 
Literature: gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 

p. 209. 



135. STUDY FOR "IMAGINARY STILL LIFE, GREEN". 1923. 
(DESSIN POUR "NATURE MORTE IMAGINAIRE. 
VERDATRE). 

Pencil. 10} x8i" (27x21 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 23": on reverse signed, dated and 
inscribed to Hilla Rebay, 1938. 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: from the artist, 1938. 



130. VILLAGE ON THE RHONE. SERRIERES. Circa 1923. 
(PAYSAGE PROVENCAL, SERRIERES). 
Oil on canvas, 41! x29+" (105 x75 cm.). 
Not signed or dated; on reverse "du paysage midi". 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 21. 

Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1954, no. 18. 

The Gleizes' spent much time in Serrieres, south of Lyon, where 
Gleizes established a second artist's community, Moly-Sabata, in 
1927. 



136. IMAGINARY STILL LIFE, GREEN. 1924. 

(NATURE MORTE IMAGINAIRE, VERDATRE). 

Oil on board, 391 x29i" (101 x75 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 24". 

Lent by tt adsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, The Ella 

Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection. 

Exhibitions: 2eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1924. 

Rene Gimpel Galerie, New \ ork, 1937, no. 24. 

Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 24. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 14. 
Literature: gray, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 

p. 209. 



131. THE SCHOOLBOY (L'ECOLIER). Circa 1924. 
Oil on canvas, 34i x26+" (87,5 x67,5 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Albert Gleizes". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. John Strauss, Glencoe, Illinois. 
Provenance: Galerie de Yarenne, Paris. 
J. W. Faulkner, Chicago. 



By the time Gleizes painted the two Imaginary Still Lifes of 1924, 
his conceptual hierarchy of values was almost wholly formed and 
still life — as a subject in itself — was insignificant for he felt that 
every day objects precluded largeness of conception. An "imagi- 
nary" still life, however, was another matter: it could reflect ideal 
relations, pure and non-imitative forms. 



132. THE SCHOOLBOY (L'ECOLIER). 1924. 

Gouache and tempera on canvas, 36i >:28i" (92 x73 cm.). 

Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Musee Cantini, Marseilles. 

Exhibition: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1954. 



133. FAMILIAR THEME, STUDY FOR "IMAGINARY STILL LIFE. 
BLUE" (PEINTURE FAMILIERE, DESSIN POUR "NATURE 
MORTE IMAGINAIRE, BLEUE"). 1923. 
Pencil, 101 x 7i" (27 x 19 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 23"; on reverse "No. 5) "Pein- 
ture familiere' Dessin mine de plomb 1923 pour Peinture a 1 Huile 
app. a Alb Gleizes". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New Y ork. 
Provenance: from the artist. 1938. 



137. IMAGINARY STILL LIFE. GREEN, second version. 1924-36. 
(NATURE MORTE IMAGINAIRE, VERDATRE). 
Oil on canvas, 39i x28i" (100 x73 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 56. 
Galerie Berry, Avignon, 1950, no. 11. 



138. SERRIERES. 1923. 

Pencil, lOi x8i" (27 x21 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes, Serrieres 23"; on reverse 

"Dessin mine de plomb "Sur Serrieres 1923' pour un peinture qui 

appartient a Alb Gleizes No. 10". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New \ork. 

Provenance: from the artist. 1938. 



79 




92 



80 





81 



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82 




102 



83 







84 




100 




104 




85 




86 




114 





115 



87 




89 




90 





125 



91 





123 



124 




131 




92 





126 



128 





93 




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136 



137 





139 



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139. COMPOSITION ACCORD, VIEW OF SERRIERES. 1924. 
(COMPOSITION ACCORD, VUE DE SERRIERES). 
Oil on canvas, 40i x29" (103,5 x74,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "A. Gleizes 24". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 20. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 12. 

Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1954, no. 21. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 24. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 30. 



This painting, the drawing which precedes it (no. 138) and the 
later gouache (no. 140) are three versions of the same real vista of 
the village of Serrieres, looking across the hilly village with its 
church steeple to its bridge across the Rhone and the fields, trees 
and hills of Isere on the far shore. 



140. SERRIERES. 1927. 

Gouache, 81 x 6" (21,5 x 15 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 27". 

Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 

Provenance: Hilla Rebay, Greens Farms, Connecticut. 

Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York, 1938. 

Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1941. 



144. COMPOSITION. 1930-31. 

Oil on canvas, 63 x39i" (160 x 100,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb. Gleizes 1930-31". 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 
Provenance: Leonce Rosenberg, Paris. 

Exhibition: Exposition d'Art Francais, National Museum 
Western Art, Tokyo, 1961-62, no. 439. 



145. STUDY FOR TRIPTYCH. 1930. 

A. STUDY FOR LEFT PART OF TRIPTYCH. 
(ETUDE POUR TRIPTIQUE, PARTIE GAUCHE). 

Gouache on board, 13i x5}" (34 xl5 cm.). 
Signed and dated "Alb Gleizes 30". 

B. STUDY FOR CENTER TRIPTYCH. 
(ETUDE POUR TRIPTIQUE, CENTRE). 
Gouache on board, 134 >;12i" (34 x31,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated "Alb Gleizes 30". 

C. STUDY FOR RIGHT PART OF TRIPTYCH. 
(ETUDE POUR TRIPTIQUE, PARTIE DROIT). 
Gouache on board, 131 x5i" (34 xl4,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated "Alb Gleizes 30". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Lester Avnet, Kings Point, New York. 
Provenance: Galerie 7, Paris. 

Margit Chanin, New York. 



of 



141. FORMS, ADORATION. 1930. 

Oil on canvas, 44i x32" (112 x81 cm.). 

Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Leonard Hutton Galleries, New York. 



There were a number of studies for wings of the great triptych of 
1930-31 in which different color tonalities were explored, but this 
seems to be the only surviving study for the central portion which 
itself has been all but destroyed by moisture. 



Echoing an old Thomist axiom, Gleizes had always told his students 
to paint the inner principles rather than the appearance of nature. 
By the early thirties he was convinced that these principles were, 
in fact, God and that He was discernable in any aspect of nature. 
Thus in this work and in the related gouache (no. 142), the painter 
reveals an essential identity between flowers and divine love. 



142. GOUACHE. 1932. 

Gouache, Hi x 10" (30 x25,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 32" 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 



143. SYMPHONY IN VIOLET. 1930-31. 
(SYMPHONIE EN VIOLET). 
Oil on canvas, 77 x51i" (196 xl31 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1930-31". 
Lent by Rudolf Indlekofer, Basel. 

Exhibition: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 29. 
Literature: chevalier, j. Albert Gleizes et le Cubisme, Basel, 
1962, p. 51. 

Gleizes wished to infuse his large compositions of many elements 
(typified by earlier works such as nos. 150, 151) with lyrical move- 
ment. By applying curvilinear greys, which picked up surrounding 
color tonalities, he made color an active compositional force, turn- 
ing the forms and causing them to create rhythmic thrusts and 
depth in the picture plane. 



146. WINGS OF TRIPTYCH. 1930-31. 

A. LEFT WING (TRIPTIQUE, PARTIE GAUCHE). 
Oil on canvas, 63 x26" (160 x66 cm.). 

Signed and dated 1.1. "Alb Gleizes 30-31". 

B. RIGHT WING (TRIPTIQUE, PARTIE DROITE). 
Oil on canvas, 63 x26" (160 x66 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1930-31". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Lester Avnet, Kings Point, New York. 

Provenance: C. Renault, Puteaux. 

Margit Chanin, New York. 

During the late 20's, Gleizes became increasingly absorbed with 
religious themes. His continuing studies of Romanesque architec- 
ture, sculpture and frescoes (in preparation for his book. La Forme 
et L'Histoire) already had given rise to a number of compositions 
which are influenced by Autun and St. Savin. 



147. COMPOSITION, FOR "MEDITATION". 1932-33. 
(COMPOSITION POUR "MEDITATION"). 
Oil on canvas, 29i x49" (75,5 x 124,5 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Alb Gleizes 32-33". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Gleizes made his first paintings for "meditation" or "contempla- 
tion" in 1932-33 and in his personal hierarchy of valid subjects 
(the key to which is found in his illustrations to the Pensees of 
Pascal) he attached the greatest significance to these works. A 



95 



drawing for this painting is reproduced in J. Chevalier s Albert 
Gleizes et le Cubisme, Basel, 1962, p. 22 and an etching is in the 
Pensees of Pascal, p. 68. 



This painting is a variation of the 1920 Woman with Black Glove, 
no. 122. 



148. LIGHT (LUMIERE). 1932-33. 

Oil on canvas, 44 x3(M" (112 x78 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alh Gleizes 32-33". 
Lent by Leonard Hutton-Hutschnecker, New York. 
Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York 1937, no. 50. 
Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 23. 

"The problem of light", wrote Gleizes, "is a problem of faith. For 
light is not concrete, it is perfectly metaphysical, being ineffable". 
Believing that space, time and light were one and the same, he felt 
that if he could make color move, analagous to the flow in a rain- 
bow's spectrum, he could approach the absolute. 



149. GREEN-BROWN SPIRAL (SPIRALE VERT-BRUN). 1932-33. 
Oil on canvas, 66i x30j" (168 x78 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 32-33". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 26. 

Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 44. 



150. COMPOSITION WITH SEVEN ELEMENTS, first version. 
(LES SEPT ELEMENTS) 1924-25. 
Oil on canvas, 56i x40l" (143,5 x 103,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "1925 Alb Gleizes". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: L 'Art d'Aujourd'hui, Paris, 1925, no. 66. 

Trente ans d'Art Independant, Paris, 1926. no. 1060. 

This first version of Seven Elements is one in a series of large 
compositions intended as studies for huge wall murals. 



151. PAINTING WITH SEVEN ELEMENTS. 1924-34. 
(LES SEPT ELEMENTS). 
Oil on canvas, 102 i x70j" (260 xl80 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 24". 
Lent by Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 29. 

Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 16. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 31. 
Literature: gleizes, a. Tradition et Cubisme, Paris, 1927, p. 205. 

(illustrated before final changes). 



153. YELLOW LIGHT (LUMIERE JAUNE). 1933. 
Oil on canvas, 33i x44$" (84,5 x 114 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1933". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 51. 

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1949, no. 19. 
Literature: GRAY, c. "Gleizes", Magazine of Art, October, 1950, 
pp. 209-210. 



154. PAINTING, MOVEMENT (PEINTURE MOBILE). 1932-33. 
Oil on canvas, 41 i x53i" (105,5 x 136,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 32-33". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Rene Gimpel Galerie, New York, 1937, no. 39. 
Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 35. 

This composition exists as an etching in a limited edition of the 
Pensees of Pascal. 



155. CRUCIFIXION. 1935. 

Oil on canvas, 54 x36i" (137 x92 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1935". 

Lent by Musee de Dijon. 

Exhibitions: Carnegie International, Pittsburgh, 1936, no. 190, 

Galerie Drouant-David, Paris, 1943, no. 28. 

Marlborough Gallery, London, 1956, no. 34. 

A larger version of this crucifixion, from 1936, is in the collection of 
Madame Gleizes. 



156. VIRGIN AND CHILD (LA VIERGE A L'ENFANT). 1935. 
Oil on canvas, 56 x37i" (142 x95 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibition: Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 30. 

This composition exists in several versions, one reversed, and was 
also adapted in ceramic tile by Anne Dangar. Although more literal 
and specifically iconographic than many works of this period, it 
nevertheless shows a loosening of painting technique. 



152. 



This is a close reworking of the first version, with the addition of 
circular rhythmic greys. The central element (derived from a 1924 
painting) is identified as "Grandeur of Man" in the illustration for 
Chapter 3 of the Pensees of Pascal. Still a third version exists, from 
1943, in which the center element is totally replaced by a series of 
rotating spirals. 



SEATED WOMAN. 1934. 

(FIGURE OVALE, CERCLE BRUN-BLEU-VERT). 
Oil on canvas, 50 x33" (127 x84 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 34". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 44. 
Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 31. 



157. MATERNITY (MATERNITE). 1936. 
Ink, 10} x7i" (27,5 xl8,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 36". 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Levin, Palm Beach. 



158. SKETCH FOR AIR PAVILION MURAL, PARIS EXPOSITION. 
(ETUDE POUR LE PA VILLON DE L'AIR A L'EXPOSITION 
DES ARTS, PARIS). 1937. 
Gouache, Hi x25i" (28,5 x64 cm.). 
Signed l.r. "Albert Gleizes 37". 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Lester Avnet, Kings Point, New York. 
Provenance: Galerie 7, Paris. 

Margit Chanin, New ^ ork. 



96 



Gleizes was commissioned to make two enormous murals at the 
Paris Exposition of 1937, one for the Pavilion of the Air and the 
other, with Survage and Leger, for the Union des Artistes. The 
mural itself is in storage in the Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de 
Paris. The central motif derives from a 1920 painting, informally 
known as The Two Americans, to which Gleizes returned in 1924 
and again in 1945. The theme was also executed in mosaic by 
Frank Perse. 



159. STUDY FOR "THE TRANSFIGURATION". 1939-41. 
(ETUDE POUR "TRANSFIGURATION"). 
Gouache, 22+ xl5i" (57 x39,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "39^0-41 Albert Gleizes". 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 

This is a study for the central panel of an immense triptych in the 
Musee des Beaux- Arts de Lyon. A related gouache of the same sub- 
ject is in the Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. These works 
represent Gleizes' final attempt to reconcile traditional iconography 
with the demands of his painting style in order to produce murals 
understandable to a wide public. The iconography of the Trans- 
figuration, however, had been largely forgotten and inclusion of its 
traditional, but obscure, symbols only further alienated the artist 
from popular appreciation. 



Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 



163. COMPOSITION. 1939. 

Oil on canvas, 72 x58i" (183 xl48 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 39". 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 42. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 29. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 40. 



164. STUDY, PAINTING FOR CONTEMPLATION. 1943. 
(ETUDE POUR SUPPORT DE CONTEMPLATION). 
Ink, 13| x9+" (34 x24 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 43". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 



165. STUDY, PAINTING FOR CONTEMPLATION. 1943. 
(ETUDE POUR SUPPORT DE CONTEMPLATION). 
Ink, 14ixll" (36x28 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 43". 
Lent by V\ alter Firpo, Marseilles. 



160. SKETCH FOR ALADDIN (ETUDE POUR ALADIN). 1938. 
Gouache, 17} xl0|" (44 x27 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 1938, Aladin". 
Lent by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York. 



161. FOUR LEGENDARY FIGURES OF THE SKY. 1939-40. 
(QUATRE PERSONNAGES LEGENDAIRES DU CIEL). 
Oil on canvas: 

A. LEONARDO DA VINCI, 118i x50" (300 xl27 cm.). 

B. aladdin, 122 x74i" (310 x 188 cm.). 

C. sinbad, 121} x74j" (308 x 189 cm.). 

D. icarus, 122 x74}" (309 x 189 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibition: Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, nos. 54, 55, 

56, 57. 
Literature: labastie, a. "Albert Gleizes", Arts de France, 9, 

1946, pp. 77-85. 

"Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, January, 

1952, p. 37. 

While working on murals for the 1937 Paris Exposition, Gleizes and 
Jacques Villon conceived the idea of executing a mural for the 
auditorium of the Ecole des Arts et Metiers, Paris. Their plan was 
to integrate four Villon panels dealing with the physical conquest 
of space with four Gleizes panels reflecting man's dream of space. 
Although the mural was never executed, many studies for it were 
produced and Gleizes made a separate canvas of each of his subjects. 
Illustrations for the Pensees of Pascal show that the Leonardo 
figure developed into the theme "Grandeur of Man" while the Icarus 
panel was related to "the hateful ego" and suggests the fall of man. 
In 1963, The Gobelins studios of the French Government began to 
translate the work of the two friends into a tapestry. 



166. PAINTING FOR CONTEMPLATION, DOMINANT ROSE AND 
GREEN (COMPOSITION, DOMINANTES ROSES ET VERTES). 
1942. 

Oil on burlap, 85i x52" (217 xl32 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 42". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Provenance: Gift, Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris, 1963. 
Literature: "Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, January, 
1952, pi. 16, p. 42. 

During the war, which made materials impossible to obtain, Gleizes 
painted on burlap, sizing the porous material with glue mixed with 
paint. He had used burlap in some of his earliest paintings and now 
found it congenial to his again vigorous touch, for it took the most 
powerful strokes even while preserving the matte surface he so 
valued. 



167. SKETCH FOR "MOVEMENT WITH BLUE SPOTS". 1943. 
(ETUDE POUR "MOUVEMENT A TACHES BLEUES"). 
Gouache, 4} x5+" (11 xl4 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 43". 
Lent by Walter Firpo, Marseilles. 



168. MOVEMENT WITH BLUE SPOTS. 1943. 
(MOUVEMENT A TACHES BLEUES). 
Oil on canvas, 45+. x61|" (115,5 xl56 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 43". 
Lent by Madame Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 46. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 32. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 43 (pi. XIII). 



162. COMPOSITION. 1937. 

Gouache, 11 x8" (28 x20 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 37" 



169. COMPOSITION. 1943. 

Gouache, 12 x8" (30,5 x20 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 43". 
Lent by Germaine Henry, Paris. 



97 



170. FOR MEDITATION (POUR MEDITATION). 1944. 
Oil on burlap, 25i x2H" (65 x54,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 44". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibition: Chapelle du Lycee Ampere, Lyon, 1947, no. 61. 



Provenance: Hans Kleinschmidt, New York. 

The drawing is preparatory to an etching in the Pensees of Pascal 
(Chapter III) (see no. 161). In a general way it relates to the Pascal 
phrase, "Le Cceur a ses raisons..." 



171. IMAGE. 1944. 

Oil on canvas, 284 x234" (73 x60 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 44". 
Lent by Musee dArt et dTndustrie, St. Etienne. 



172. SKETCH DEDICATED TO ANNE DANGAR. 1944. 
(ETUDE DEDIEE A ANNE DANGAR). 
Gouache, 6 J x4|" (17 xll,5 cm.). 

Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1944"; inscribed "pour ma 
chere eleve Anne Dangar Saint Remy-de-Provence Avril 1945 Les 
Mejades Albert Gleizes". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



173. THE SCHOOLBOY (L'ECOLIER), third version. 1944. 
Oil on burlap, 391 x31i* (100 x80 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 44". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

This is a late return to earlier compositions, see nos. 131 and 132. 



178. COMPOSITION, WHITE, BLUE, VIOLET. 1952. 
(COMPOSITION, BLANC, BLEU, VIOLET). 
Oil on board, 314 x20i" (80,5 x52 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 52". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 53. 
Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 39. 
Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 47 (pl.XV). 



179. COMPOSITION, THE DRAGONFLY. 1951-52. 
(COMPOSITION, LA LIBELLULE). 
Oil on canvas, 31+ x22i" (80 x57 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibition: Marlborough, London, 1956, no. 42 (misdated). 

After completing the etchings for Pascal, Gleizes' painting style 
achieved a lightness and liquidity of touch approached only by the 
New York and Bermuda series, (nos. 77 to 117). 



174. FOR MEDITATION, WHITE. 1944. 
(POUR MEDITATION, BLANC). 
Oil on burlap, 36i x294" (92 x75,5 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Alb Gleizes 44". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 



180. COMPOSITION ROSE. 1952. 

Oil on board, 29i x20i" (74 x51 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 52. 
Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 38. 



175. THE MISTRAL (VENT DU NORD). 1945. 
Oil on canvas, 39i x3H" (100 x80 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 1945". 
Lent by Rene Deroudille, Lyon. 

Literature: deroudille, r. "Albert Gleizes et les destinees du 
Cubisme", i 4 Soli, no. 2, 1955, pp. 6-7. (ill. as 
Ornement). 

To his typical tilting planes and circular motions, since the late 30's 
Gleizes had increasingly added what he called "the cadence", dark 
emphasis to regulate the movement of his forms. 



181. GRAY-BROWN FIGURE (FIGURE GRIS-BRUN). 1952. 
Oil on board, 42 i x26l" (109 x66,5 cm.). 
Not signed or dated. 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 
Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 54. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 40. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 49 (pi. XVI). 

The austere effect of his lucid construction even within the flowing 
ease of the late style, is always dominant, especially in a work of 
somber colors. 



176. COMPOSITION. 1948. 

Oil on board, 18 x 15" (46 x38 cm.). 
Signed and dated l.r. "Albert Gleizes 48". 
Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

This is among the last paintings made before Gleizes' two year 
project, the illustrations of the Pensees of Pascal. 



177. GRANDEUR OF MAN (GRANDEUR DE L'HOMME). 1950. 
Ink, 124x9+" (32 x24 cm.). 

Signed l.r. "A. G."; inscribed 1.1. "No 18. Ill Grandeur d'Homme". 
Lent by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, 
Mrs. Kay Hillman, 1964. 



182. ARABESQUES. 1953. 

Oil on board, 284 x23+" (73 x60 cm.). 

Not signed or dated. 

Lent by Madame Albert Gleizes, Paris. 

Exhibitions: Galerie Lucien Blanc, Aix-en-Provence, 1960, no. 55. 

Musee Calvet, Avignon, 1962, no. 42. 

Musee de Grenoble, 1963, no. 51. 
Literature: Albert Gleizes: Hommage, Lyon, 1954. pi. 8. 

Most of the titles of the late paintings, and this is his last, were 
tentative. But Arabesques is a term he often used and it has refer- 
ences appropriate to his often stated admiration for the lyrical and 
passionate geometry of Islamic art (see "Arabesques, L'Entrelac 
Arabe", in Cahiers du Sud, special no., August-September, 1935). 



98 





141 



148 



99 




100 




144 





147 





154 



102 




146 A 



103 




! 
146 B 



104 





150 



105 




106 





156 



107 




108 





161 A 



161 B 



109 








161 C 



161 D 



110 




Ill 




'!"*> 



112 






113 



/ 






176 



114 





181 



115 




116 




117 




182 



D(imiE.\T.vrio.\ 



120 



om: 11 a\ i Minti i 'io\s 



galerie dalmau, Barcelona, 1916 (Fall), Albert Gleizes. 

galerie de l'effort moderne, Paris, 1920, Albert Gleizes. See 

Bulletin de l' Effort Moderne, Paris, no. 1, 1924. 
der sturm, Berlin, November, 1920, Albert Gleizes. 91st exhibition 

of der sturm. Travelled to Stuttgart, Rome and New York. See 

Der Sturm, Baden-Baden 54, 1954, p. 266. 
chez la cible (povolozky), Paris, April-May, 1921, Albert Gleizes. 
belmaison gallery of modern art, Wanamaker's, New York, 

March 15-31, 1923, Exhibition of Recent Paintings by Albert 

Gleizes. 
kuhn and kuhn, Dresden, 1924, Albert Gleizes. 
galerie vavin-raspail, Paris, 1925, Albert Gleizes Retrospective. 
abstraction-creation, Paris, June 1-15, 1934, Exposition Gleizes: 

Oeuvres de 1901-1934. 
rene gimpel galerie, New York, December 15, 1936-January 15, 

1937, Albert Gleizes. A Retrospective Exhibition. 
galerie drouant-david, Paris, May 20-June 5, 1943, Albert Gleizes. 

Preface by Jean Chevalier. 
galerie des carets, Paris, May 2-24, 1947, Albert Gleizes. Preface 

by Dom. Angelico Surchamp, o.s.B. 
chapelle du lycee ampere, Lyon, November 15-December 14, 1947, 

Albert Gleizes, 50 Ans de Peinture. Preface by Marcel Michaud, 

extracts by Surchamp and Gleizes from Temoignages, 12 and 14. 
galerie DES garets, Paris, April, 1948, Gleizes: 30 Gouaches, 

Dessins et Ceramiques. 
passedoit gallery, New York, October 10-November 5, 1949, 

Albert Gleizes Retrospective Exhibition. 
galerie berry, Avignon, July 22-August 20, 1950, Albert Gleizes, 

Peintures 1915^18. 
galerie moullot, Marseilles, September, 1950, Albert Gleizes. 
chapelle de l'oratoire, Avignon, July 22-August 31, 1950, Pensees 

de Pascal sur I Homme et Dieu: 57 Eaux Fortes par Albert 

Gleizes. Preface by Albert Gleizes. 
musee d'art et d'industrie, Saint Etienne, September, 1950, Pensees 

de Pascal sur I' Homme, et Dieu: 57 Eaux Fortes par Albert 

Gleizes. Preface by Maurice Allemand. 
librairie la hune, Paris, October 20-November 10, 1950, Pensees 

de Pascal sur I'Homme et Dieu: 57 Eaux-Fortes par Albert 

Gleizes. Introduction by Gleizes. 
musee des beaux-arts de lyon, December 2-31, 1950, Pensees de 

Pascal sur I'Homme et Dieu, Illustrees de 57 Eaux-Fortes 

Originales par Albert Gleizes. Preface by Rene Jullian. 
galerie colette allendy, Paris, November, 1951, Albert Gleizes. 
galerie lucien blanc, Aix-en-Provence, November-December, 1954, 

Retrospective Albert Gleizes. Preface by Andre Schoeller. 
galerie mathias fels, Paris, 1956, Albert Gleizes. 
Marlborough fine art, ltd., London, September-October, 1956, 

Albert Gleizes: Paintings, Gouaches, Drawings. Preface by 

Juliette Roche Gleizes. 
galerie simone heller, Paris, September-October, 1958, Albert 

Gleizes. 
galerie lucien blanc, Aix-en-Provence, July- August, 1960, Albert 

Gleizes, 1881-1953. 



chateau DE lourmarin, Lourmarin, July-August, 1960, Albert 

Gleizes, Art Sacre. 
galerie 7, Paris, May 24-June 14, 1962, Exposition a" Albert Gleizes. 
musee calvet, Avignon, Spring-Summer, 1962, Albert Gleizes, 1881- 

1953. Texts by Lucien Blanc, Waldemar George, Fernand Rude. 
MUSEE de grenoble, Grenoble, June 15-August, 1963, Albert Gleizes 

et Tempete dans les Salons, 1910-1914. Preface by Gabrielle 

Kueny. 



GROUP I MilOtl I l«\> 



Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Paris, 1902. 

Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1903. 

Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1904. 

Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Paris, 1906. 

Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Paris, 1907. 

LA FRANgAlSE, Paris, January-February, 1908, Les Peintres de 

"I'Abbaye". 
Exposition de V Art Francois, Spring, 1908, organized by Alexandre 

Mercereau for the Toison d'Or, Moscow. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1910. 
Jack of Diamonds (Valet de Carreau), Moscow, 1st exhibition, 1910; 

2nd exhibition, 1912. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1910. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1911. 
Brussels Independants: Delauny, Gleizes, Leger, Le Fauconnier, 

Segonzac, Brussels, June 10-July 3, 1911. Catalogue preface by 

Apollinaire. 
galerie d'art ancien et d'art contemporain, Paris, November 20- 

December 16, 1911, Exposition d' Art Contemporain. Catalogue 

preface by Rene Blum. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1911. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1912. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1912. 
Societe Normande de Peinture Moderne, Rouen, opened May 6, 1912. 

2eme Exposition. 
musee municipal suasso, Amsterdam, October 6-November 7, 1912, 

Moderne Kunst Kring. Catalogue preface, "La Sensibility Mo- 
derne et le Tableau", by Henri Le Fauconnier. 
galerie de la boetie, Paris, October 10-30, 1912, Salon de la 

Section d'Or. Catalogue preface by Rene Blum. 
galerie berthe Weill, Paris, January 17-February 1, 1913, Gleizes, 

Metzinger, Leger. Catalogue introduction by J. Granie. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1913. 
International Exhibition of Modern Art (The Armory Show), New 

York, Chicago, Boston, 1913. 
der sturm, Berlin, November, 1913, Expressionisten, Kubisten, 

Futuristen. 
galerie hans goltz, Munich, August-September, 1913, 2. Gesamt 



121 



Ausstellung Neue Kunst. Catalogue texts by Hausenstein and 

Andre Salmon. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1913. Catalogue preface by Marcel Sembat. 
der sturm, Berlin, September 20-October, 1913, Erster Deutscher 

Herbstsalon. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1914. 
Exposition Universelle, Lyon, 1914. 
s. v. u. MANES, Prague, February-March, 1914, Moderni Umeni 

(Modern Art). 45th exhibition, catalogue preface by Alexandre 

Mercereau. 
galerie andre groult, Paris, April 6-May 3, 1914, Exposition de 

Sculptures de R. Duchamp- Villon; Dessins, Aquarelles d Albert 

Gleizes; Gravures de Jacques Villon: Dessins de Jean Metzinger. 

Catalogue preface by Andre Salmon. 
der sturm, Berlin, July, 1914, Gleizes, Metzinger, Villon, Duchamp- 

Villon. 
Carroll galleries, New York, to January 2, 1915, First Exhibition 

of Contemporary French Art. Preface by Frederick James Gregg. 
CARROLL galleries, New York, to February 13, 1915, Second Ex- 
hibition of Works by Contemporary French Artists. Catalogue 

preface unsigned. 
Carroll galleries, New York, March 8-April 3, 1915, Third Ex- 
hibition of Contemporary French Art. 
bourgeois galleries, New York, April 3-29, 1916, Exhibition of 

Modern Art, arranged by a group of European and American 

Artists in New York. 
montross gallery, New York, April 4—22, 1916, Pictures by Crotti, 

Duchamp, Gleizes, Metzinger. 
Den Franske Utstilling, Oslo, November-December, 1916. 
bourgeois galleries, New York, February 10-March 10, 1917, 

Exhibition of Modern Art, arranged by a group of European and 

American Artists in New York. 
grand central palace, New York, April 10-May 6, 1917, New York 

Independents (Society of Independent Artists). 
bourgeois galleries, New York, November 11-December 11, 1917, 

Exhibition of Modern Art. 
ardsley studios, Columbia Heights, New York, to March 31, 1919, 

Lithographs by Fantin-Latour and Recent Paintings by Albert 

Gleizes. Catalogue preface by Hamilton Easter Field. 
bourgeois galleries, New York, May, 1919, Annual Exhibition of 

Modern Art. Catalogue preface by Albert Gleizes. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1919. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1920. 
galerie de la boetie, Paris, March, 1920, 2eme Salon de la Section 

d'Or. Travelled to Brussels and Amsterdam. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1920. 
Pennsylvania academy of fine ARTS, Philadelphia, 1920, Loan 

Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings by Artists of the Modern 

French School. 
galerie Weill, Paris, December, 1920-January, 1921, Fauves, Cu- 

bistes et Post-Cubistes. 
der sturm, Berlin, January, 1921, 93rd exhibition, Albert Gleizes, 

Jacques Villon, Louis Marcoussis. 
Exposition Internationale des Arts Plastiques, Geneva, January, 1921. 
museum of French art, New York, March 16-April 3, 1921, Loan 

Exhibition: Works by Cezanne, Redon... and others. Catalogue 

foreword by Forbes Watson. 
der sturm, Berlin, September, 1921, Hundertste Ausstellung. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1921. 
galerie de l'effort moderne, Paris, 1921, Les Maitres du Cubisme. 



belmaison gallery of modern art, Wanamaker's, New York, 

March 9-31, 1922. 
ler Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1923. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1923. 
musee municipal, .Amsterdam, April-May, 1924, Exposition de 

VEjfort Moderne. 
galerie briant-robert, Paris, 1924, Gleizes, Valmier, Lurcat, 

Marcoussis. 
2eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1924. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1924. 
galerie vavin-raspail, Paris, January 12-31, 1925, Section d'Or. 

Catalogue preface by Guillaume Dalbert. 
L'Art d'Aujourd'hui (L'Art Plastique Non-Imitatif), Paris, No- 
vember 30-December, 1925. 
3eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1925. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1925. 
the Brooklyn museum, New York, November-December, 1926, 

International Exhibition of Modern Art, arranged by the 

Societe Anonyme. 
grand palais, Paris, 1926, Salon des Independants, Trente Ans d'Art 

Independant. 
4-eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1926. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1926. 
5eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1927. 
6eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1928. 
Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1928. 
7eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1929. 

de hauke & Co., New York, April, 1930, Cubism (period 1910-1913). 
Le Salon de Printemps, Nice, March 29-April 14, 1930. Catalogue 

preface by Albert Gleizes, organized by Walter Firpo. 
Seme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1930. 
leonce Rosenberg, Paris, April 25-May 25, 1932, Exposition 

d'Oeuvres Cubistes, Surrealistes et Abstraites. 
galerie bonjean, Paris, May-June, 1932, L'Epoque Heroique du 

Cubisme. 

STUTTGART KUNSTGEBAUDE, Stuttgart, 1932. 

L'Art Rhodanien, Serrieres, September, 1932. 

12eme Salon des Tuileries, Paris, 1934. 

grand palais, Paris, January 20-March 4, 1934, Societe des Artistes 

Independants, (50th Anniversary). 
les expositions de "beaux-arts", Paris, March-April, 1935, Les 

Createurs du Cubisme. Catalogue by Raymond Cogniat, preface 

by Maurice Raynal. 
Premier Salon de I' Art Mural, Paris, May 31-June 30, 1935. 
Carnegie institute, Pittsburgh, October 15-December 6, 1936, 

International Exhibition of Paintings. 
MUSEUM OF LIVING ART (a. E. GALLATIN COLLECTION), New York 

University, New York, December, 1936. Catalogue by Jean 

Helion. 
petit palais, Paris, June-October, 1937, Les Maitres de I' Art 

Independant, 1895-1937. 
carnegie institute, Pittsburgh, October 14-December 5, 1937, 

International Exhibition of Paintings. 
Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques, Paris, 1937. 
l' association d'art mural, Paris, Troisieme Salon de I' Art Mural, 

June, 1938. 
george wildenstein and Co., London, January, 1939, From the 

Salon d'Automne. 
musee galliera, Paris, March-April, 1939, De Vldee a la Forme. 

(Exhibition porza). 



122 



berner KDNSTMDSEDM, Bern. May 6-June 4, 1939, Picasso, Braque, 

Gris,' Leger,' Gleizes, Bores, Beaudin, Vines, Laurens. 
galerie de France, Paris, May 25-Jime 30, 1945, Le Cubisme 1911- 

1918. Catalogue preface by Bernard Dorival. 
musee municipal d'art moderne, Paris, July, 1945, Salon des Re'alites 

Nouvelles. 
the London gallery, London, May, 1947, The Cubist Spirit in its 

Time. 
galerie des garets, Paris, April 20-May 11, 1948, Gouaches par 

Albert Gleizes; Ceramiques d'apres Gleizes par Anne Dangar. 
Palais des papes, Avignon, July 20-October 30, 1948, Exposition 

d'Art Sacre. 
galerie colette allendy", Paris, February 27-March 15, 1951, 

Robert Delaunay, Sonia Delaunay, Albert Gleizes. 
stedelijk van abbe museum, Eindhoven, March, 1951, De Europese 

Kunst. 
Palais du kursaal, Menton, August 3-October 1, 1951, ler Biennale 

de Peinture de France. 1st prize to Gleizes. (Recreation of Menton 

Biennale, Gleizes room in Marseilles, October, 1951.) 
MDSEU de arte moderna DE Sao paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. October, 

1951, /. Bienal. 

musee national dart moderne, Paris, May-June, 1952, L'Oeuvre du 

XXe siecle. 
societe des beaux-arts de dragutgnan, Draguignan, May-June 15, 

1952, 3eme Salon, Peinture et Sculpture. 
Salon de Cavaillon, Cavaillon, November, 1952. 

galerie pab. Ales, December 20-28, 1952, Gleizes, Picabia, Survage. 
musee national d'art moderne, Paris, January 30-April 9, 1953, 

Le Cubisme 1907-1914, Preface by Jean Cassou. 
hotel de ville, Avignon, February-March, 1953, Avignon Salon. 
ecole des beaux-arts, Paris, March-April, 1953, Exposition du 

Cubisme aux Arts Traditionnels, "la lecon d' Albert Gleizes". 
cimaise de parts, Paris, May 5-14, 1953, Les Peintres de I'Fcole de 

Gleizes. 
Salon des Independants, Paris, 1953. 
museu DE arte moderna DE sao paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil, December, 

1953, II Bienal. 

moderna museets vanner, Stockholm, 1954, Cezanne Till Picasso. 
stuttgarter kunstkabinet, Stuttgart, November 24-26, 1954, 20 

Kunst- Auktion, Sammlung Nell Walden. 
musee national d'art moderne, Paris, 1954, Le Dessin, de Toulouse- 
Lautrec aux Cubistes. Catalogue by Bernard Dorival. 
Marlborough gallery', London, 1955, Twentieth Century Masters. 
the university of Michigan museum, Ann Arbor, 1955, The Winston 

Collection. 
galerie de l'institut, Paris, March 18-April 13, 1955, Evocation de 

I'Epoque Heroique. Introduction by W aldemar George. 
musee d'antibes, Antibes, Summer, 1955, Tapisseries, Atelier J. de 

la Baume-Durrbach. Tapestries, after Albert Gleizes. 
rose fried gallery', New York, October 17-November 26, 1955, 

30 Works by 17 Modern Masters. 
galerie de l'institut, Paris, March 16-April 5, 1956, Six Disciples 

de Gleizes. Including Rene Barlerin, Jean Chevalier, Albert 

Coste, Henriette Gremeret, Maurice Gremeret and Rene Pascal. 
kunsthalle Recklinghausen, Recklinghausen, June 16-July 31, 

1957, Verkannte Kunst: Ausstellung der Ruhrfestspiele. 
musee d'art et d'industrie, Saint Etienne, 1957, Art Abstrait, Les 

Premieres Generations (1910-1939). Catalogue by Maurice 

Allemand. 
galerie axdre bost, Valence, August 31-September 14, 1957, 

Autour de Moly-Sabata. 



Detroit institute of arts, September 27-November 3, 1957: 
Virginia museum of art, December 13-January 15, 1958; 

san francisco museum of art, January 23-March 13, 1958; 

Milwaukee art institute, April 11-May 12, 1958; The Col- 
lection of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis Winston. 
societe vivaroise des beaux-arts. Hotel de Ville de Privas, October 
27-November 11, 1957, Albert Gleizes et les Peintres Vivarois 

et Rhodaniens. Introduction by Louis Cros. 
Paintings from the Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, October 2, 

1957-April 15, 1958, institute of contemporary art, Boston, 

Massachusetts; columbus gallery of fine arts, Columbus, 

Ohio: Carnegie institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; walker 

art center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Marlborough FINE art ltd., London, October-December, 1957, 

XIX and XX Century European Masters. 
galerie knoedler, Paris, 1958, Les Soirees de Paris. 
the Brooklyn museum, New York, April 28-July 27, 1958, The 

Brooklyn Bridge. 
galerie fricker, Paris, March 13-April 9, 1959, Rythmes et Danses. 
musee national d'art moderne, Paris, July, 1959, L'Ecole de Paris 

dans les Collections Beiges. 
Marlborough fine art ltd., London, February-March, 1960, AVA" 

and XX Century Drawings and Watercolors. 
yale university art gallery', New Haven, Connecticut, May -June, 

1960, Exhibition by Yale Collectors. 
Ecole de Paris, Art Decoratif. Tokyo, 1960. Dangar compositions 

after Gleizes. 
musee national d'art moderne, Paris, November 4, 1960-January 

23, 1961, "Les Sources du XXe siecle", Les Arts en Europe de 

1884 a 1914. 
musee national d'art moderne, Paris, July-September. 1961, 

Depuis Bonnard, and haus der kunst, Munich, 1961, Von 

Bonnard Bis Heute. 
international galleries, Chicago, September 15-October 7, 1961, 

Modern Masters. 
nationalgalerie, Berlin, September 24-November 19, 1961, Der 

Sturm. 
haus der kunst, Munich, 1961, Les Chefs d'Oeuvres des Collections 

Privees Francois. 
national museum of western art, Tokyo, November, 1961- 

January, 1962, Exposition d'Art Francois, 1840-1940. 
hotel estrine, St. Remy-de-Provence, July-August, 1962, Gleizes et 

Disciples. 
museum des 20. jahrhunderts, Vienna, September 21-November 4, 

1962, Kunst von 1900 bis Heute. 
wallraf-richartz museum, Cologne, September 12-December 9, 

1962, Europdische Kunst 1912. 
NEW YORK public library', New York, 1963, Stravinsky and the 

Theatre: A catalogue of Decor and Costume designs for stage 

productions of his works 1910-1962. 
universite de Paris, palais de la decouverte, Paris, January 20- 

February 17, 1963, Formes mathematiques, Peintres, Sculpteurs 

Contemporains. 
loeb student center, New York, March 6-20, 1963, Selected 

Works from the N. Y. U. Art Collection. 
galerie suillerot, Paris, June, 1963, Les Peintres Cubistes. 
kaplan gallery', London, October-November 11, 1963, The Cubist 

Painters. 
galerie romanet, Paris, November, 1963, Deux Cents Aquarelles et 

Dessins de Renoir a Picasso. 
galerie romanet, Paris, April, 1964, Quelques Tableaux parmi les 

Autres. 



123 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



The bibliography divides into two groups : first, a complete list of works 
by Albert Gleizes, including articles, books, unpublished manuscripts 
and illustrated books ; and second, a selected list of works about Albert 
Gleizes together with related source material, including articles, books, 
unpublished manuscripts and those general studies of Modern Art 
which contain significant material about the artist. Entries are arranged 
chronologically. D.R. 




\ltlllll> BY GLEIZES 



"L'Art et ses representants. Jean Metzinger", Revue Independante, 
Paris, September, 1911, pp. 161-172. 

"Le Fauconnier et son ceuvre", Revue Independante, Paris, October, 
1911. Unlocated article listed in Le Fauconnier bibbographies. 

"Les Beaux Arts. A propos du Salon d'Automne", Les Bandeaux d'Or, 
series 4, no. 13, 1911-1912, pp. 42-51. 

"Cubisme devant les Artistes", Les Annates politiques et litteraires, 
Paris, December, 1912, pp. 473-475. A response to an inquiry. 

"Le Cubisme et la Tradition", Montjoie, Paris, February 10, 1913, p. 4. 
Reprinted in Tradition et Cubisme, Paris, 1927. 

[Extracts from O Kubisme], Soyuz Molodezhi, Sbornik, St. Peters- 
burg, no. 3, 1913. With commentary. Reference from gray, 
Camilla. The Great Experiment: Russian Art, 1893-1922, New 
York, Abrams, 1962, p. 308. 

"Opinions (Mes Tableaux)", Montjoie, Paris, nos. 11-12, November- 
December, 1913, p. 14. 

"C'est en allant se jeter a la mer que le fleuve reste fidele a sa source", 
Le Mot, Paris, vol. 1, no. 17, May 1, 1915. 

"French Artists Spur on American Art", New York Herald, October 
24, 1915, part ir, pp. 2-3. An interview. 

[Interview with Gleizes (and Duchamp, Picabia and Crotti)], The 
Literary Digest, New York, November 27, 1915, pp. 1224-1225. 

"La Peinture Moderne", 391, New York, no. 5, June 1917. 

"The Abbey of Creteil, A Communistic Experiment", The Modern 
School, Stelton, New Jersey, October, 1918. Edited by Carl 
Zigrosser. 



"The Impersonality of American Art", Playboy, New Y ork, nos. 4 and 

5, 1919, pp. 25-26. Translated by Stephen Bourgeois. Preface to 

an exhibition of modern art at the Bourgeois Galleries, New \ ork, 

in 1919. 
"Vers une epoque de batisseurs", Clarte (Bulletin Francois), Paris, 

series 1, October-November (?), 1919. 
[Letter to Herwarfh Walden, April 30, 1920], Der Sturm, Berlin, 

Nationalgalerie, September, 1961, p. 46. 
"L" Allaire dada". Action, Paris, no. 3, April, 1920, pp. 26-32. Re- 
printed in Engbsh in Motherwell, Robert, ed. Dada Painters and 

Poets, New York, 1951, pp. 298-302. 
"Dieu Nouveau", La Vie des Lettres, Paris, October, 1920, p. 178 ft*. 
"RehabiHtation des Arts Plastiques", La Vie des Lettres et des Arts, 

Paris, series 2, no. 4, April, 1921, pp. 411—122. Reprinted in 

Tradition et Cubisme, Paris, 1927. 
"L'Etat du Cubisme aujourd'hui", La Vie des Lettres et des Arts, 

Paris, series 2, no. 15, 1922, pp. 13-17. 
"Ein Neuer Naturalismus? Eine Rundfrage des Kunstblatts", Das 

Kunstblatt, vol. 6, no. 9, 1922, pp. 387-389. Reply to an inquiry. 
"Perle", La Bataille Litteraire, Brussels, vol. 4, no. 2, February 25, 

1922, pp. 35-36. A poem, New York, 1916. 
"Tradition und Freiheit", Das Kunstblatt, vol. 6, no. 1. 1922. pp. 

26-32. 
"La Peinture et ses Lois : Ce qui devait sortir du Cubisme", La J ie des 

Lettres et des Arts, Paris, series 2, no. 12. March, 1923, pp. 26-73. 
"Jean Lurcat", Das Kunstblatt, vol. 7, no. 8, 1923, pp. 225-228. 



124 



"L'Art Moderne et la Societe Nouvelle", Moniteur de V Academic 

Socialiste, Moscow, 1923. Reprinted in Tradition et Cubisme, 

Paris, 1927, pp. 149-161. 
"Oil va la peinture moderne?", Bulletin de TEffort Moderne, Paris, 

no. 5, May, 1924, p. 14. Response to an inquiry. 
"La Peinture et ses Lois", Bulletin de VEffort Moderne, Paris, no. 5, 

May, 1924, pp. 4-9; no. 13, March, 1925, pp. 1-4. 
"A propos de la Section d'Or de 1912", Les Arts Plastiques, Paris, 

no. 1, January, 1925, pp. 5—7. 
"Chez les Cubistes: une enquete", Bulletin de la Vie Artistique, 

Paris, vol. 6, no. 1, January, 1925, pp. 15-19. Response to an 

inquiry. 
"LTnquietude, Crise Plastique", La Vie dcs Lettres et des Arts, Paris, 

series 2, no. 20, May, 1925, pp. 38-52. 
"A l'Exposition, que pensez-vous du... Pavilion de Russie", Bulletin 

de la Vie Artistique, vol. 6, no. 11, June 1, 1925, pp. 235-237. 

Response to an inquiry. 
"Cubisme", La Vie des Lettres et des Arts, Paris, series 2, no. 21, 1926, 

pp. 51-65. Announced as French text of Kubismus, Bauhaus- 

bucher 13, 1928, written in September, 1925, at Serrieres. 
"Cubisme (Vers une conscience plastique)". Bulletin de VEffort 

Moderne, Paris, no. 22, February, 1926, pp. 6-7; no. 23, March, 

1926, pp. 4-6; no. 24, April, 1926, pp. 4-5; no. 25, May, 1926, 

pp. 1-3; no. 26, June, 1926, pp. 1-3; no. 27, July, 1926, pp. 1^; 

no. 28, October, 1926, pp. 1-3; no. 29, November, 1926, pp. 1-3; 

no. 30, December, 1926, pp. 1-2; no. 31, January, 1927, pp. 1-3; 

no. 32, February, 1927, pp. 1-5. Extracts, announced as partial 

contents of Kubismus, Bauhausbiicher 13. 
"L'Epopee. De la Forme Immobile a la Forme Mobile", Le Rouge et 

le Noir, Paris, October, 1929, pp. 57-99. The final French text of 

Kubismus, Bauhausbiicher 13, 1928. 
"Charles Henry et le Vitalisme", Cahiers de I'Etoile, Paris, no. 13, 

January-February, 1930, pp. 112-128. 
[Preface to La Forme et I'Histoire], V Alliance Universelle, Paris, 

April 30, 1930. 
"Les Attitudes Fondamentales de l'Esprit Moderne", Bulletin de la 

VII Congres de la Federation Internationale des Unions Intel- 

lectuelles, Cracow, October, 1930. 
[Preface to an Exhibition of Paintings by Gottfried Graf, Berlin, 1931]. 

Quoted in Chevalier, "Le Denouement traditionnel du Cubisme, 

2", Confluences, Lyon, no. 8, February, 1942, p. 193. 
"Civilization et Propositions", La Semaine Egyptienne, Alexandria, 

October 31, 1932, p. 5. 
"Moly-Sabata ou le Retour des Artistes au Village", Sud Magazine, 

Marseilles, no. 1021, June 1, 1932. 
[Statement}, Abstraction-Creation, Art Non-Figuratif, Paris, no. 1, 

1932, pp. 15-16. 

"La Grande Ville et Ses Signes", La Liberte, Paris, May 7, 1933, p. 2. 
"Vers la Regeneration Individuelle", Regeneration, Paris, new series, 

no. 46, July-August, 1933, pp. 117-119. 
[Statement], Abstraction-Creation, Art Non-Figuratif, Paris, no. 2, 

1933, p. 18. 

"Le Retour de l'Homme a la Vie", Regeneration, Paris, no. 49, 

March, 1934, pp. 7-12. 
"Jeunesse", Regeneration, Paris, no. 51, May, 1934, pp. 4-7. 
[Statement], Abstraction-Creation, Art Non-Figuratif, Paris, no. 3, 

1934, p. 18. 

"Agriculture et Machinisme", Regeneration, Paris, no. 53, August- 
September, 1934, pp. 11-14. Enlarged version of article originally 
published in Lyon Republicain, January 1, 1932. 

"Le Groupe de l'Abbaye. La Nouvelle Abbaye de Moly-Sabata", 
Cahiers Americains, Paris, New York, no. 6, Winter, 1934, pp. 
253-259. 



"Le Retour a la Terre", Beaux-Arts, Paris, December 14, 1934, p. 2. 
"Peinture et Peinture", Sud Magazine, Marseilles, no. 8, August (?) 

1935, Offprint. 

"Retour a l'Homme. Mais a Quel Homme?", December, 1935. Offprint, 

probably from Slid Magazine, Marseilles. 
"Arabesques", Cahiers du Sud, (special number), "LTsIam et l'Occi- 

dent", vol. 22, no. 175, August-September, 1935, pp. 101-106. 

Article dated Serrieres d'Ardeche, November, 1934. 
[Statement], Abstraction-Creation, Art Non-Figuratif, Paris, no. 5, 

1936, pp. 7-8. 

"La Question de Metier", Beaux-Arts, Paris, October 9, 1936, p. 1. 
"Art Regional", Tous les Arts a Paris, Paris, December 15, 1936. 
"Le Probleme de la Lumiere", Cahiers du Sud, vol. 24, no. 192, March, 

1937, pp. 190-207. 

"Cubisme et Surrealisme: Deux Tentatives Pour Redecouvrir 
l'Homme", 2eme Congres International d'Esthetique et de Science 
de I'Art, Paris, 1937. 

La Signification Humaine du Cubisme, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1938. 
Lecture delivered at Petit Palais, Paris, July 18, 1938. 

"Signification Humaine du Cubisme", Beaux-Arts, Paris, July 22, 

1938, p. 6. 

"Tradition et Modernisme", Art et Artist, Paris, no. 37, January, 1939, 

pp. 109-115. 
"Artistes et Artisans", L'Opinion, Cannes, May 31, 1941. 
"Spirituality, Rythme, Forme", Confluences: Les Problemes de la 

Peinture, Lyon, 1945, section 6. Special number, edited by 

Gaston Diehl. 
"Apollinaire, la Justice et Moi", Guillaume Apollinaire, Souvenirs et 

Temoignages, Paris, Editions de la Tete Noir, 1946, pp. 53-65. 

Edited by Marcel Adema. 
"L'Arc-en-Ciel, Cle de FArt Chretien Medieval", Les Etudes Philoso- 

phiques, new series, no. 2, April-June, 1946. 
[Statement], Realites Nouvelles, Paris, no. 1, 1947, pp. 34-35. 
"PreRminaires a une Etude sur les Variations Iconographiques de la 

Croix", Temoignages, Cahiers de la Pierre-qui-vire, October, 

1947. 
"Y-a-t-il un Art Traditionnel Chretien?", Temoignages, Cahiers de la 

Pierre-qui-vire, July, 1948. 
"L'Art Sacre est Theologique et Symbolique", Arts, Paris, no. 148, 

January 9, 1948, p. 8. Reprint of unlocated article by Gleizes, 

"Autorite Spirituelle et Pouvoir Temporel" (1939^10). 
"Active Tradition of the East and West", Art and Thought, London, 

February, 1948, pp. 244-251. A tribute to Ananda K. Coomara- 

swamy. 
"Les Pensees de Pascal", Chapelle de VOratoire, Avignon, July 22- 

August 31, 1950. Introduction by Gleizes. 
"Peinture d'Opinion et Peinture de Metier", V Atelier de la Rose, 

Lyon, June, 1951. 
"Reflexions sur l'Art Dit Abstrait et du Caractere de l'lmage dans la 

Non-Figuration, I", L' Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, October, 1951. 
"Reflexions sur l'Art Dit Abstrait et du Caractere de l'lmage dans la 

Non-Figuration, II", L Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, January, 1952. 
"L'Esprit Fondamental de l'Art Roman", U Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, 

September, 1952. 
"Mentalite Renouvelee, I", V Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, December, 

1952. 
"L'Esprit de Ma Fresque 'L'Eucharistie'", U Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, 

March, 1953. 
"Mentalite Renouvelee, II", L Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, June, 1953. 
"Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, Saint-Leger-Vauban, nos. 6-7, 

January, 1952. Extracts from his written works. 
"Conformisme, Reforme, et Revolution", Correspondances, Tunis, no. 

2, 1954, pp. 39^16. Preceded by a biographical note by Jean 

Cathelin. 



125 



"'Anne Dangar, a Potter', (a funeral elegy). La Belle Journee est 
Passee", Zodiaque, Saint-Leger-Vauban, no. 25, April, 1955. 

"Caracteres de l'Art Celtique", extracts from Gleizes', La Forme et 
VHistoire, 1932. Reprinted in Actualite de l'Art Celtique, Ca- 
hiers d'Histoire et de Folklore, Lyon, 1956, pp. 55-97. 

[Introduction to] jellett, mainie, The Artists' Vision, Dundalk, 
Dundalgan Press, 1958, pp. 25^5. Written in 1948. 



Art et Production, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1933. Lecture delivered at 

\\ arsaw, French Embassy, for the Pobsh LInion Intellectuelle, 

April 24, 1932. 
Art et Science, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1933; second edition, Aix, 1961. 

Lecture delivered at Lodz, Poland, April 28, 1932, and Stuttgart, 

May 6, 1932. 
Homocentrisme ; le Retour de V Homme Chretien; le Rythme dans les 

Arts Plastiques, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1937. 
Souvenirs, le Cubisme 1908-1914, Lyon, Cahiers Albert Gleizes 1, 

l'Association des Amis d'Albert Gleizes, 1957. Fragment from a 

larger manuscript. 



BOOKS BY GLEIZES 



Du Cubisme, Paris, Figuiere, 1912. With Jean Metzinger. 

Cubism, London, T. Fisher Unwin, 1913. With Jean Metzinger. First 
English edition. 

O Kubisme, St. Petersburg, 1913. With Jean Metzinger. Translated by 
E. Niesen. Reference from gray, Camilla. The Great Experiment: 
Russian Art, 1893-1922, New York, Abrams, 1962, p. 308. 

O Kubisme, Moscow, 1913. With Jean Metzinger. Translated by M. 
Voloshm. Reference from gray, Camilla. The Great Experiment: 
Russian Art, 1893-1922, New York, Abrams, 1962, p. 308. 

Du Cubisme, Paris, Compagnie Francaise des Arts Graphiques, 1947. 
With Jean Metzinger. Foreword by Gleizes. 

Du Cubisme, Geneva, 1918. Book unlocated, often listed in Gleizes 
bibliographies as Cubisme: recorded in hintze, Modern Konst 
1900-Totet, Helsinki, 1930, p. 353 as "newly revised edition by 
Gleizes" [of -Du Cubisme]. 

Du Cubisme et des Moyens de le Comprendre, Paris, La Cible, Povo- 
lozky, 1920. German edition: Vom Kubismus; die Mittel zu 
Seinem Verstandnis, Berlin, Der Sturm, 1922. 

La Mission Creatrice de V Homme dans le Domaine Plastique, Paris, 
Povolozky, 1921. 

La Peinture et Ses Lois: Ce Qui Devait Sortir du Cubisme, Paris, 
1924; second edition, La Pense'e Universitaire, Aix, 1961. First 
published in La Vie des Lettres et des Arts, Paris, March, 1923. 

Poslannictwo Tworcze Czlowieka W Dziedzinie Plastyki, Praesens, 
no. 2, Warsaw, 1927. Special number. 

Tradition et Cubisme: Vers une Conscience Plastique. Articles et 
Conferences 1912-1924, Paris, Povolozky, 1927. A collection of 
fifteen articles from various publications. 

Peinture et Perspective Descriptive, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1927. Lec- 
ture delivered to the Carnegie Foundation for the French Union 
Intellectuelle, at Paris, March 22, 1927. 

Kubismus, Bauhausbiicher 13, Munich, Albert Langen Verlag, 1928. 

Vie et Mort de VOccident Chretien, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1930. First 
published in the periodical, Cahiers de VEtoile, 1928, 1929. 

Life and Death of the Christian West, London, Dennis Dobson Ltd., 
1947. Foreword by H. J. Massingham; translated by Aristide Mes- 
sinesi. 

Vers une Conscience Plastique: La Forme et VHistoire, Paris, Povo- 
lozky, 1932. 

Art et Religion, Sablons, Moly-Sabata, 1933. Lecture delivered at 
Paris, Foyer de l'Association des Etudiants Chretiennes, March 
21, 1931 and at Dresden, Galerie Neue Kunst Fides, April 13, 
1932. 



I \l»l III ISIII l> MANUSCRIPTS BY <-l I iy.1 > 



Contorsions, 1916. Manuscript of a novel, impressions of New York 
and Montreal, written on shipboard, en route to Spain. 

L'Art a Travers VEvolution Generale (En Attendant la Victoire), 
New York, 1917. 

La Tortue Emballee (Poems) 1915-1918. Poems, New York, Barce- 
lona, Bermuda. 

Le Cavalier du Dimanche (Cinema- Proses), 1915-1918. New York, 
Barcelona, Bermuda. 

Souvenirs. An account of 1915 arrival in New \ork. Undated frag- 
ment. 

Souvenirs (Puissances du Cubisme), dated February, 1944. A thirty 
page fragment. 

Robert Delaunay, 1933. Revised in 1937 and 1945. Announced for 
publication by Abstraction-Creation. Complete manuscript of a 
critical study. 



BOOKS ILLISTOATKI) BY GLEIZES 



allard, Roger. Le Bocage ou le divertissement des amants citadins 

et champetres, Paris, "ceuvres et jours" Figuiere, 1911. Illustrated 

with woodcuts by Gleizes, dating from 1910. 
Suite des Bois d'Albert Gleizes pour Au Pays du Mufte, Paris, Edou- 

ard-Joseph, 1920. 
tailhade, laurent. Au Pays du Mufle, Paris, Edouard- Joseph, 1920. 

11 woodcuts by Albert Gleizes. dating from 1919. 
mercereau, Alexandre. La Conque Miraculeuse, Paris, Povolozky, 

1922. 28 compositions by Albert Gleizes, dating from 1910, cut 

by P. A. Gallien. 
pascal, blaise. Pensees sur I'Homme et Dieu, Casablanca, Editions 

de la Cigogne, 1950. Choix et classement de Genevieve Lewis. 

57 etchings by Albert Gleizes. 



126 



AltTH'LKN OX GLK1ZKS IM) 1(11 tllll Mil IK I '1 \ I I III VI 



reiser. "Salon Nationale des Beaux-Arts, 1902", Nouvelle Revue 

Moderne, Paris, June, 1902. 
"Salon d'Automne, 1903", Alliance Republicaine, October 13, 1903. 

Unsigned review. 
raynal. "Salon d'Automne, 1904", La Vie, Paris, October, 1904. 
lesigne, ERNEST. "Fraternite Laique, La Societe Ernest-Renan", 

Radical, December 16, 1905. 
"L' Association Ernest-Renan, Fraternite laique", Avenir Mutalite, 

Bordeaux, Saturday, December 23, 1905. Address of Edouard 

Petit in the hall of the Theatre Pigalle, Montmartre. 
guillemot, "Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts", L 'Art et les Artistes, 

Paris, June, 1906. 
mercereau, ALEXANDRE. "Une Cite d'Art en France", Toison d'Or, 

Moscow, no. 10, 1906. 
d'auray. "Images et Mirages", Europe Politique, Paris, January, 1908. 

Review of Vildrac's poems. 
kahn, gustave. "Preface to La Terrestre Tragedie by Henri Martin" 

(Barzun), L'Art Social, Paris, 2nd year, series 3, February, 

1907, p. 1. 
amaudru, NOEL. "Voyages en Icarie-Les Poetes du Socialisme, du 

Reve a la Realite, L'Abbaye de Creteil", XIX Siecle, Paris, 

November 23, 1907. 
normandy, Georges. "Les Peintres de Creteil", Petite Republique, 

Paris, January 24, 1908. Review. 
caubert, Ernest. "L'Exposition de 'PAbbaye'", Ulntransigeant, 

Paris, January 28, 1908. 
moine, LEON. "Les Peintres de PAbbaye", Critique Independante, 

Paris, February 13, 1908. 
"Exposition de l'Art Francais", (organized by Alexandre Mercereau), 

Toison, d'Or, Moscow, nos. 7-9, 1908, p. 15. Unsigned review. 
apollinaire, guillaume, "Salon des Independants", Ulntransigeant, 

Paris, March 22, 1910. 
metzinger, jean. "Note Sur La Peinture", Pan, 3rd year, no. 10, 

October-November, 1910, pp. 649-652. 
allard, Roger. "Au Salon d'Automne de Paris", L'Art Libre, Lyon, 

November, 1910, pp. 441-443. 
mourey, Gabriel, "xxvn Salon des Independants", Le Journal, Paris, 

April 20, 1911. 
fort, PAUL. "Le Clair de Lune et mon Ame", Vers et Prose, Paris, 

no. 25, April-June, 1911, p. 94. A poem dedicated to Albert 

Gleizes. 
salmon, andre. "Salon des Independants", Paris- Journal, Paris, 

April 21, 1911. 
allard, roger. "Sux Quelques Peintres", Les Marches du Sud-Ouest, 

no. 2, June, 1911. 
PUY, Michel. "Les Independants", Les Marges, Paris, July, 1911. 
metzinger, jean. "Cubisme et Tradition", Paris- Journal, Paris, 

August 16, 1911, September 15, 1911. Divided into two issues. 
mercereau, Alexandre. "Exposition de l'Art Contemporain, Rue 

Tronchet", Vers et Prose, Paris, no. 27, October-December, 

1911, p. 139. 
nayral, jacques, and mercereau, Alexandre. "Les Artistes de 

Passy", Paris-Journal, Paris, October 17-30, 1911. 
arnyvelde, andre. Gil Bias, Paris, Fall, 1911. Interview with Albert 

Gleizes (interview with two journalists). Reprinted in Cabanne, 
L'Fpopee du Cubisme, Paris, 1963, pp. 158-161. 



granie, j. "Au Salon d'Automne", Revue d'Europe et d'Amerique, 
Paris, November 15, 1911. 

metzinger, jean. "Alexandre Mercereau", Vers et Prose, Paris, no. 27, 
October-December, 1911, pp. 122 IT. 

allard, ROGER. "Le Salon des Independants, 1912", La Revue de 
France et des Pays Francais, March, 1912. Also printed in Cote, 
March 19-20, 1912. 

moussey, G. "Le Salon des Independants, 1912", Journal, Paris, 
March 22, 1912. 

tabarant, adolphe. "Les Independants", Section, Paris, March 19, 
1912. 

KAHN, OLIVIER. "La Section d'Or", Mercure de France, Paris, vol. 100. 
November-December, 1912, pp. 181-182. 

riviere, jacques. "Cubisme", Revue d'Europe et d'Amerique, 
March 1, 1912. 

salmon, andre. Gil Bias, June 22, 1912. Announces exhibition of 
Section d'Or. 

werth, LEON. "Le Cubisme et le Salon d'Automne", La Grande Revue, 
Paris, vol. 5, October 25, 1912, pp. 833-836. 

le fauconnier, Henri. "La Sensibilite Moderne et le Tableau", Mo- 
derne Kunst Kring, musee municipal suasso, Amsterdam, Oc- 
tober 6-November 7, 1912, pp. 17-27. Reprinted in Le Faucon- 
nier, stedelijk museum, Amsterdam, March 7-April 13, 1959, 
additional text by Conrad Kickert. 

hourcade, Olivier. "Salon d'Automne", Paris-Journal, Paris, 
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sigeant, Paris, March, 1913. 
la fresnaye, ROGER DE. "De Limitation de la Peinture et Sculpture", 

La Grande Revue, July 25. 1913. 
hausenstein. "Vom Kubismus", Der Sturm, Berlin, vol. 4, nos. 170- 

171, July, 1913, pp. 67-70. 
fort, PAUL. "Le Dit du Braconnier", Vers et Prose, Paris, no. 33, 

April-June, 1913. Poem dedicated to Albert Gleizes. 
boccioni, umberto. "II dinamismo futurista e la pittura francese", 

Lacerba, vol. 1, no. 15, August 1, 1913, p. 170. 
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wromant, marc. "La Peinture Simultaniste", Comoedia, June 2, 1914. 
severini, gino. "Symbolisme Plastique et Symbolisme Litteraire", 

Mercure de France, Paris, vol. 113, no. 423, February 7 1, 1916, pp. 

466-176. 
GOTH, max. "Odeurs de Partout", 391, Barcelona, no. 1, January 25, 

1917. 
daubler, theodor. "Die Sammlung Bienert-Dresden", Das Kunst- 

blatt, Berlin, vol. 3, no. 6, 1919, pp. 161-167. 
GEORGE, waldemar. "La Vie des Arts-Albert Gleizes", La Forge, 

Paris, no. 21, November, 1919, pp. 223-228. 
W. L. "Notizen", Das Kunstblatt, Berlin, vol. 4, no. 6, 1920, p. 190. 
steinitz, ernst. "Neue Kunst aus Hannoverschem Privatbesitz", Das 

Kunstblatt, Berlin, vol. 4, 1920, p. 74. 
GOLL, IVAN. "tJber Kubismus", Das Kunstblatt, Berlin, vol. 4, no. 7, 

1920, p. 221. 
therive, andre. "Le Salon Cane des Independants", Action, Paris, 

no. 2, March, 1920. 
"Andre Salmon iiber der Pariser Herbstsalon", Der Ararat, Munich, 

vol. 1, nos. 5-6, March, 1920. Unsigned commentary on Andre 

Salmon's review of the Salon d' Automne. 
"Der Salon der Unabhangigen von einem Amateur", Der Ararat, 

Munich, vol. 1, no. 7, April, 1920. Lnsigned commentary. 
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Ararat, Munich, vol. 1, no. 8, July, 1920. 
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nis", Kunstchronik und Kunstmarkt, Leipzig, year 55; Neue 

Folge, vol. 31, no. 45, August 6, 1920, pp. 868-869. Review of 

Gleizes' book. 
"Opinions sur le Cubisme", Selection, Brussels, series 1, no. 2, Sep- 
tember 15, 1902, pp. 6, 8. Several paragraphs quoted from Glei- 
zes' Du Cubisme et les Moyens de le Comprendre, Paris, 1920. 
ROSENBERG, leonce. "Un apercu historique du Cubisme", Selection, 

Brussels, series 1, no. 2, September 15, 1920. 
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no. 5, October, 1920. 
vauvrecy. "Le Salon d'Automne", L'Esprit Nouveau, Paris, no. 2, 

November, 1920. 
FELS, florent. "Pariser Kunstchronik", Das Kunstblatt, Berlin, 

vol. 4, no. 10, 1920. 
tzara, Tristan, "Interview de Jean Metzinger sur le Cubisme (a propos 

d'Albert)", 391, Barcelona, no. 14, November, 1920. 
basler, adolphe. "Franzosische Kunstliteratur", Cicerone, Leipzig, 

vol. 12, no. 24, December, 1920, p. 900. 
picard, jean. "Der Pariser Herbstsalon", Der Ararat, Munich, vol. 2, 

no. 1, January, 1921. 
SCHNEEBERGER, A. "Fauves, Cubistes et Post-Cubistes", La Vie des 

Lettres et des Arts, Paris, series 2, no. 3, January, 1921, pp. 

361-363. 
vauvrecy. "Le Salon d'Automne", L'Esprit Nouveau, Paris, no. 5, 

February, 1921. 
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Paris, series 2, no. 3, 1921, pp. 353-355. 
ridder, andre de. "Notes sur la Peinture Francaise Nouvelle", Selec- 
tion, Brussels, series 1, no. 8, March 15, 1921. 
hecke, P. G. van. "Interview dans le Miroir", Selection, Brussels, series 

1, no. 8, March 15, 1921. On Cubism. 
george, waldemar. Review of Gleizes exhibition at La Cible, L'Esprit 

Nouveau, Paris, no. 8, May, 1921, pp. 903-904. 
george, waldemar. "Un Exposition de Groupe" at Galerie de l'Effort 

Modeme, L'Esprit Nouveau, Paris, no. 9, June, 1921. 
poisson, J. "Gleizes", Revue de I'Epoque, Paris, June, 1921, pp. 

1039-1041. 
raynal, maurice. "Revue de l'Annee: Peinture and Sculpture", 

L'Esprit Nouveau, Paris, nos. 11-12, July-August, 1921. 
george, waldemar. "Ein Brief. Uber die Kunstlerische Situation in 

Frankreich", Das Kunstblatt, Berlin, vol. 6, no. 1, 1922, pp. 1-7. 
westheim, PAUL. "Kunst in Frankreich: 'L'Esprit'", Das Kunstblatt, 

Berlin, vol. 6, no. 1, 1922. pp. 8-25. 
lhote, andre. "D'un Cubisme Sensible", La Vie des Lettres et des 

Arts, Paris, no. 15, 1922, p. 1-6. 
marinetti, F. T. "Cubisme Sensible ou Dynamisme Plastique' . La Vie 

des Lettres et des Arts, Paris, no. 16, 1922, pp. 7-9. Review of 

Lhote's book. 
salmony, Alfred. "Dusseldorf ", Das Kunstblatt, Berlin, vol. 6, no. 8, 

1922, pp. 353-356. An account of an exhibition. Summer, 1922. 
[Review of Gleizes show at Belmaison Galleryl, Neiv York Herald, 

March 25, 1923. Unsigned. 
basler. adolphe. "Pariser Chronik", Der Cicerone, Leipzig, vol. 15. 

no. 18, 1923. Review of Salon des Tuileries. 
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no. 21, 1923. Chapter 5 of La Peinture Moderne, Paris, 1924. 



128 



OZENFANT and JEANNERET. "Le Cubisme: Deuxieme epoque", L Esprit 
Nouveau, Paris, no. 24, 1924, p. 2676. Illustration: Army Doctor. 

raynal, MAURICE. "Quelques Intentions du Cubisme"', Bulletin de 
I'Effort Moderne, nos. 1, 2, 3, January-March, 1924. 

George. WALDEJtAR. "La Section d'Or", Paris-Journal, Paris, January 
16, 1925. 

leclere, tristan. "Cubisme", Larousse Mensuel, Paris, no. 217, 
March, 1925, pp. 723-724. 

szihya, EMIL. "Paris am Anfang der Neuer Kunst", Das Kunstblatt, 
Berlin, vol. 9. no. 4, 1925, pp. 115-117. 

perrine, ANDRE DE la. "Modemisme dans le Literature", La Vie des 
Lettres et des Arts, Paris, series 2, no. 20, May, 1925, pp. 65-98. 

Ray, London, no. 2, 1927, p. 9. Illustrations. 

"Tradition et Cubisme", Le Rouge et le Noir, Paris, no. 8, March, 
1924, pp. 1193-1195. A review of Gleizes' book, probably by 
Roger Brielle. 

G. D. (Georges Duthuit). [Review of Kubismus by Gleizes], Cahiers 
d'Art, Paris, 4th year, nos. 2-3, March-April, 1929, p. 16. 

teriade, E. "Doeumentaire sur la Jeune Peinture: L'Avenement Clas- 
sique du Cubisme", Cahiers d'Art, Paris, 4th year, no. 10, De- 
cember, 1929, pp. 448 ff.: Cahiers d'Art, Paris, 5th year, no. 1, 
January, 1930, pp. 17 ff. 

"Notices sur les Peintres Exposants", Montparnasse, Paris, n.s., vol. 
16, no. 58, January, 1930. Anonymous review of an exhibition of 
modem art organized by Montparnasse in major Brazilian cities: 
Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. 

bazin, Germain. "Oeuvres Cubistes, Surrealistes, et Abstraites", 
V Amour de V Art, Paris, no. 6, June, 1932, p. 217. 

lhote, andre. "Naissance du Cubisme", L' Amour de V Art, Paris, 
January, 1933, pp. 215-218. Histoire de I' Art Contemporain, 
chapter 8. 

cogniat, Raymond. "Le Cubisme Methodique, Leger et 'L'Effort 
Moderne'", V Amour de I' Art, Paris, January, 1933, pp. 234-236. 
Histoire de V Art Contemporain, chapter 8. 

Pologne Litteraire, Lodz, Poland, May 15-June 15, 1933, p. 3. Gleizes 
illustration. 

daniel, M. j. "Albert Gleizes et les Architectes", Sud Magazine, Mar- 
seilles, vol. 7, no. 117, July 15, 1934, p. 18. An account of a lecture 
by Gleizes for Abstraction-Creation group. 

furth, dlana h. "Cubisme et Creation", Cahiers Americains, Paris- 
New York, no. 6, Winter, 1934, pp. 246-252. 

rebay, hilla. "A Definition of Non-Objective Painting", Design, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 14 ff. 

shapley, John. [Review of Homocentrisme by A. Gleizes], Art Bulle- 
tin, New York, vol. 19, no. 4, December, 1937, pp. 606 ff. 

pulby, pierre. "Homocentrisme ou le Retour de l'Homme Chretien", 
Etudes Traditionnelles, Paris, vol. 43, no. 218, February, 1938, 
pp. 63-68. Review of Gleizes' book. 

defries, Amelia. "Catholic Religious Art", Catholic Herald, London, 
February, 1938. Letter. 

chevalier, jean. "Position Humaine d'Albert Gleizes", Anthologie, 
Liege, no. 5, May-June, 1938. 

gadthier, m. "Moly-Sabata", Art et Decoration, Paris, no. 67, Sep- 
tember, 1938, pp. 293-300. 

chevalier, jean. "Le Cubisme, Conscience Nouvelle", Bulletin Tri- 
mestriel de I' Association Amicale des Anciens Sieves de I'Ecole 
Pratique de Commerce et d'Industrie de Vienne, Vienne, vol. 19, 
no. 76, July, 1939; Journal de Vienne et de I'Isere, May 9, 1939. 



Accounts of a lecture given May 2, 1939 at I'Ecole Pratique de 

Commerce et d'Industrie de Vienne. 
chevalier, jean. "Le denouement traditionnel du Cubisme, 1", Con- 
fluences, Lyon, no. 7, January, 1942, pp. 35-43. 
chevalier, jean. "Le denouement traditionnel du Cubisme, 2", Con- 
fluences, Lyon, no. 8, February, 1942, pp. 182-194. 
BOISSY, GABRIEL. "Wlaminck entre Gleizes et Picasso", Le Journal, 

Lyon, June 30, 1942. 
torre, guillermo de la. "Recapitulacion del Cubismo", Cuadernos 

Americanos, Mexico, vol. 4, no. 2, March-April, 1945, pp. 216-237. 
basler, adolphe. "A la Source de l'Art Moderne", Confluences, 

Lyon, 1945, pp. 55-58. Gaston Diehl, ed. 
labastie, albert. "Albert Gleizes", Arts de France, Paris, no. 9, 

1946, pp. 77-85. 
surchamp, dom. angelico. "LTtineraire pictural et spirituel d'Albert 

Gleizes", Temoignages, Cahiers de la Pierre-qui-vire, no. 12, 

March, 1947, pp. 62-78. Reprinted in Lyon exhibition catalogue, 

1947. 
surchamp, dom. angelico. "L'Enseignement d'Albert Gleizes", 

Temoignages, Cahiers de la Pierre-qui-vire, no. 14, October, 1947, 

pp. 390-405. Reprinted in Lyon exhibition catalogue, 1947. 
dorival, Bernard. "Deux Sculpteurs et Deux Peintres", IS'ouvelles 

Litteraires, Paris, May 22, 1947. Review of an exhibition at 

Galerie des Garets, 1947. 
c. v. "Albert Gleizes", Emporium, Bergamo, vol. 107, no. 639, March, 

1948, p. 132. Review of Lycee Ampere exhibition. 
read, Herbert. "Constructivism: the art of Naum Gabo and Antoine 

Pevsner", Gabo and Pevsner by Ruth Olson and Abraham 

Chanin, New York, Museum of Modem Art, 1948. Introduction 

by Read. 
judkins, winthrop. "Toward a Reinterpretation of Cubism", Art 

Bulletin, New York, vol. 30, no. 4, December, 1948, pp. 270-278 
preston, stuart. New York Times, New York, October 16, 1949. 

Review of Gleizes' exhibition at Passedoit Gallery, 
c. B. New York Herald Tribune, New York, October 16, 1949. Review 

of Gleizes' exhibition at Passedoit Gallery. 
GRAY", cleve. "Albert Gleizes", Magazine of Art, New York, vol. 43, 

no. 6, October, 1950, pp. 207-210. 
surchamp, dom. angelico. "Sur les Pensees de Pascal illustres par 

Albert Gleizes", Temoignages, Cahiers de la Pierre-qui-vire, no. 

29, 1950 (?), pp. 202-208. 
pouyaud, Robert. "Le Message d'Albert Gleizes", Atelier de la Rose, 

Lyon, no. 2, January, 1951, pp. 85—88. 
chevalier, jean. "Affirmer la Vie", Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, no. 2, 

January, 1951, pp. 89-92. 
surchamp, dom. angelico. "Presence d'Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, 

Saint-Leger-Vauban, nos. 6-7, January 7 , 1952. 
cassou, jean. [Preface to "Presence d'Albert Gleizes"], Zodiaque, 

Saint-Leger- \ auban, nos. 6—7, January, 1952. 
degand, leon. "L'Oeuvre du XXe Siecle", Art d'Aujourd'hui, Paris, 

Series 3, no. 5, June, 1952, p. 24. Review of exhibition organized 

by James Johnson Sweeney at Musee National d'Art Moderne, 

Paris. 
"Une Fresque de Gleizes, realisee en equipe a Chantilly, 'Les Fon- 
taines'", Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, no. 9, March, 1953. 
romefort (le pere de). "Du Cubisme a la Peinture Traditionnelle, 

L'Oeuvre d'Albert Gleizes", Centre Interprofessionnel de Theolo- 

gie Appliquee (C.I.T.A.), Paris, March 6, 1953. 



129 






degand, LEON (et al) "Cubisme", Art d'Aujourd'hui, Paris, series 4, 

nos. 3-4, May-June, 1953, pp. 14. 20, 21, 23, 30. Special issue. 
metzinger, jean. "Le Cubisme apporta a Gleizes le moyen decrire 

l'espace", Arts, Paris, no. 418, July 3-9, 1953, p. 7. 
iiowe, R. w. ''Albert Gleizes", Apollo, London, vol. 58, August, 1953, 

p. 44. An obituary. 
gauthier, maxmillien. "Albert Gleizes", Larousse Mensuel, Paris, 

no. 469, September, 1953, pp. 327-328. An obituary. 
"Sens de l'Art Moderne", Zodiaque, Saint-LegerA auban, vol. 1, nos. 

18-19, January, 1954, pp. 18-29. An interview with .Albert 

Gleizes. 
chevalier, jean. "Cubisme et Technique Religieuse: L/Oeuvre et la 

Pensee d' Albert Gleizes", L'Art d'Eglise, Bruges, Abbaye de 

St. Andre, no. 3, 1954, pp. 287-290. 
deroudille, rene. "Albert Gleizes et les destinees du Cubisme", 

i 4 Soli, Turin, vol. 2, no. 2, March-April, 1955, pp. 6-7. 
roche, Juliette (gleizes). "Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, La Belle 

Joumee est Passee, Saint-LegerA auban, no. 25, April, 1955, pp. 

24-28. 
greenwood, Thomas. "L'Esthetique Religieuse du Peintre Gleizes", 

Zodiaque, La Belle Journee est Passee, Saint-LegerA auban, no. 

25, April, 1955, pp. 56-58. 
surchamp, DOM. angelico. "Lueidite d" Albert Gleizes", Zodiaque, La 

Belle Joumee est Passee. Saint-LegerA auban, no. 25, April, 1955. 
chevalier, jean. "Le Probleme du Critere: Structures objectives", 

L' Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, no. 18, May, 1955, pp. 273-288. 
"Moly-Sabata", Atelier de la Rose, Lyon, 1955. Preface by Rene 

Deroudille, articles by Robert Pouyaud, Cesar Geoffray and 

others. 
Burlington Magazine, London, vol. 98, no. 644, November, 1956, 

p. 420. Review of Gleizes exhibition at Marlborough. 
deroudille, rene. "Albert Gleizes au Musee de Lyon", Bulletin des 

Muse'es de Lyon, Lyon, no. 1, 1956, pp. 1-11. 
schoener, allon T. "Gleizes", Cincinnati Art Museum Bulletin, 

Cincinnati, March, 1956, pp. 18-22. 
Sylvester, David. "London \\ eighs Pioneer Cubist", The New York 

Times, October 28, 1956. 
chevalier, jean. "Exposition Albert Gleizes a Londres", Cahiers 

Albert Gleizes, I, L" Association des Amis d'Albert Gleizes, Lyon, 

1957, pp. 33-37. 
calvesi, maorizio. "II Futurismo di Boccioni, Formazione e Tempi", 

Arte Antica e Moderna, Bologna, no. 2, April-June, 1958, pp. 

149-169. Discussion of possible Gleizes influence. 
Schneider, pierke. Art News, New York, vol. 57, no. 6, October, 1958, 

p. 54. Review of Gleizes' exhibition at Galerie Simone Heller, 

Paris. 
blanc, lucien. ".\lbert Gleizes", Vision sur les Arts, Montpellier, no. 

10, 1960, pp. 30-34. 
delehant, J. "Les debuts de l'art abstrait: Gleizes et Kupka", Jaar- 

boek, Koninklijk Museum Voor Schone Kunsten, (1954-60), 

Antwerp, 1960, pp. 109-116. 
reidemeister, LEOPOLD. "Zum Geleit", Der Sturm, Herwarth W'alden 

und die Europaische Avantgarde, Berlin 1912-1932, Berlin, 

Nationalgalerie, September, 1961. 
ROEBINS, Daniel. "From Cubism to Abstract -Art. The Evolution of 

the Work of Gleizes and Delaunay", Baltimore Museum of Art 

News, Baltimore, vol. 25, no. 3, Spring, 1962, pp. 9-21. 
reverdy, pierre. "Sur le Cubisme", Nord-Sud, no. 1, March 15, 1917, 



pp. 5-7. Reprinted in Entretiens. Paris, no. 20, 1962. 
golding, joiin. "Guillaume Apollinaire and the Art of the Twentieth 

Century", Baltimore Museum of Art News, Baltimore, vol. 26, 

no. 4, Summer, Autumn, 1963, pp. 2-31. 
roebins, damel. "From Symbolism to Cubism: The Abbaye de 

Creteil", Art Journal, New York, vol. 23, no. 2, Winter, 1963-64, 

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nationale d'Art Nouveau, Lodz, 1932. 

sartoris, alberto. Elementi dell' Architettura, Milan, Hoepli, 1932, 
pp. 21-22. 

grohmann, will. Die Sammlung Ida Bienert, Dresden, Potsdam, 
Midler & Kiepenheuer, 1933. 

romains, jules. La Vie Unanime, Poemes, 1904-07, Paris, 1934. 
7th edition. 

raynal, Maurice and cogniat, Raymond. Les Createurs du Cubisme, 
Paris, Expositions de "Beaux-Arts", 1935. 

barr, Alfred h. Jr. Cubism and Abstract Art, New York, The Mu- 
seum of Modern Art, 1936, pp. 82, 92. 

guisan, gilbert. Poesie et Collectivite, 1890-1914: Le Message 
Social des Oeuvres Poetiques de I'Unanimisme et de V Abbaye, 
Lausanne, Paris, 1938. 

terrasse, Charles. French Painting in the XX Century, London, 
Paris, New York, Hyperion, 1939, pp. 20-21. 

bonfante, egidio and ravenna, juti. Arte Cubista con "les Medita- 
tions Esthetiques sur la Peinture" di Guillaume Apollinaire, 
Venice, Ateneo, 1945. 

adema, marcel. Guillaume Apollinaire, Souvenirs et Temoignages, 
Paris, 1946. 

dorival, Bernard. Les Etapes de la Peinture francaise contempo- 



raine, vol. 2: Le Fauvisme et le Cubisme, 1905-1911; vol. 3: 

Depuis le Cubisme, 1911-44, Paris, Gallimard, 1944. 2nd edition, 

1946. 
dorival, Bernard. Contemporary French Painting, Edinburgh, 

Robert Grant for the Society of Scottish Artists, 1946. 
francastel, Pierre. Nouveau Dessin, Nouvelle Peinture, Paris, 

Librairie de Medicis, 1946. 
clouard, henri. Histoire de la Litterature Francaise, du Symbolisme 

a nos jours, Paris, 1947. Chapter V, "Offensive Moderniste, 

V Abbaye", pp. 542 ff. 
duhamel, Georges. Lumieres sur ma Vie, vol. 3, Le Temps de la 

Recherche, Paris, 1947. 
kahnweiler, daniel-henry. Juan Gris, his Life and Work, New 

York, Curt Valentin, 1947. Translated by Douglas Cooper. 
lemaitre, Georges. From Cubism to Surrealism in French Literature, 

Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press, 1947, p. 89. 
fosca, Francois. La Peinture en France depuis trente ans, Paris, 

Milieu du monde, 1948, pp. 103, 109-110. 
pouyaud, Robert. Du Cubisme a la Peinture traditionnelle, Cla- 

mecy, 1948. 
First American Le Fauconnier Exhibition, New York, J. B. Neumann. 

Exhibition catalogue, New Art Circle, December 18, 1949- 

January 15, 1949; bibliography by Hannah B. Muller. 
azcoaga, enrique. El Cubismo, Barcelona, Ediciones Omega, 1949. 
DREIER, KATHERINE S., DUCHAMP, MARCEL and HAMILTON, GEORGE 

HEARD. Collection of the Societe Anonyme: Museum of Modern 

Art 1920, New Haven, Yale University Art Gallery, 1950. Gleizes 

by Duchamp, pp. 145-146. 
Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris, Musees Nationaux, 1950. 

Catalogue-guide by Jean Cassou, Bernard Dorival and Mme 

Genevieve Homolle. 
seuphor, michel. U Art Abstrait: Ses Origines, Ses premiers maitres, 

Paris, Maeght, 1950, p. 146. 
benezit, E. Dictionnaire critique et documentaire des peintres, sculp- 

teurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Paris, Librairie Griind, 1951, 

vol. 4, p. 305, "Albert Gleizes", by Jacques Busse. 
Motherwell, Robert, ed. The Dada Painters and Poets, New York, 

(The Documents of Modern Art), Wittenborn, Schultz, 1951. 

Arthur Cravan on Gleizes, p. 10; The 2nd Section d'Or and 

Dada, p. 172; Barcelona, 1916, p. 262; Gleizes: The Dada Case, 

pp. 298-303. 
roger-marx, Claude. Le Paysage francais de Corot a nos jours, Paris, 

Plon, 1952, pp. 64-65. 
gray, Christopher. Cubist Aesthetic Theories, Baltimore, Johns 

Hopkins Press, 1953, pp. 45, 75-90, 96, 115, 125, 137, 154, 161. 
Maitres de I'art abstrait. Album 1, Paiis, Art d'aujourd'hui, 1953. 

Introduction by Leon Degand, includes Gleizes pochoir. 
cassou, jean; jullian, rene, villon, metzinger, severini, et al. 

Albert Gleizes: Hommage, Lyon, Atelier de la Rose, 1954. 
gaffe, rene. Introduction a la Peinture francaise: de Manet a 

Picasso, Paris, Editions des artistes, 1954, pp. 209-210, 218, 231. 
Philadelphia museum of art. The Louise and Walter Arensberg 

Collection: 20th Century Section, Philadelphia, 1954, pi. 92-94. 
walden, nell and schreyer, lothar. Der Sturm: Ein Erinnerungs- 

buch an Herwarth Walden und die Kilnsller aus dem Sturmkreis, 

Baden-Baden, Woldemar Klein, 1954. 



131 



/ 



francastel, Pierre. Histoire de la Peinture Frangaise, vol. II, "Du 
Classicisme au Cubisme", Paris, Elsevier, 1955, pp. 134, 137, 138, 
150, 194. 

descargues, pierre. Le Cubisme, Paris, Somogy, 1956, pp. 5-14. 

fosca, FRANCOIS. Bilan du Cubisme, Paris, La Bibliotheque des Arts, 

1956, pp. 50-51, 69-75. 

lake, Carlton and maillard, Robert, eds. Dictionary of Modern 

Painting, Paris, Hazan, ed. ; New York, Paris Book Center, 1956, 

p. 113. 
lhote, andre. La Peinture Liberee, petite histoire du Cubisme, Paris, 

Bernard Grasset, 1956, pp. 127-136. 
VINCENT, Madeleine. La Peinture des XIX et XX Siecles, Catalogue 

du Musee de Lyon, Lyon, 1956, pp. 313-322. 
buffet-picabia, gabrielle. Aires Abstraites, Geneva, Pierre Cailler. 

1957, pp. 17, 37, 57, 153-180 passim. 

delaunay, Robert. Du Cubisme a Vart abstrait, Paris, s.e.v.p.e.n., 

1957, pp. 70, 71, 99, 109-112, 113, 114, 136, 214, 219, 222, 225, 
226, 240. Edited by Pierre Francastel, with a catalogue by Guy 
Habasque. 

dorival, Bernard, Les Peintres du Vingtieme Siecle, Paris, Editions 

Pierre Tisne, 1957, pp. 74-86, 93-96, 100, 101, 118, 119, 129. 
peters, heinz. Die Bauhaus-Mappen, Cologne, Christoph Czwik- 

litzer, 1957, p. 11. 
selz, peter. German Expressionist Painting, Berkeley and Los 

Angeles, University of California, 1957, pp. 7, 210, 265, 272. 
seuphor, MICHEL. Dictionary of Abstract Painting, New York, Paris 

Book Center, 1957, pp. 179-180. 
vallier, dora. Jacques Villon, Paris, Cahiers d'Art, 1957, p. 69. 
baljeu, joost. Mondrian or Miro, Amsterdam, de Beuk, 1958, pp. 

16-21, extensive quotations from Gleizes in notes. 
courthion, pierre. Art Independant, Paris, Albin-Michel, 1958, pp. 

80-81. 
dorival, Bernard. Twentieth Century Painters: From Cubism to 

Abstract Art, New York, Universe Books; Paris, Editions Pierre 

Tisne, 1958, pp. 75, 111. 
jellett, mainie. The Artist's Vision, Dundalk, Dundalgan Press, 

1958. Edited by Eileen MacCarvill, introduction by Albert Glei- 
zes. 

apollonio, umbro. Fauves and Cubists, New York, Crown, 1959, pp. 

60-70, 76, 79, 82. 
the art gallery of Toronto. Painting and Sculpture, Toronto, 

1959. 
dorival, Bernard. Le Dessin Francois de Signac aux Abstraits, 

Paris, Musees Nationaux, 1959. 
golding, john. Cubism: A History and an Analysis 1907-1914, 

London, Faber and Faber, 1959. Extensive references. 
the solomon R. Guggenheim museum. A Handbook to The Solomon 

R. Guggenheim Museum Collection, New York, 1959, pp. 62-65. 
habasque, guy. Cubism, Geneva, Skira, 1959. 
lebel, ROBERT. Marcel Duchamp, New York, Grove Press, 1959, pp. 

9, 10, 11, 13-27, 39, 43-45, 79, 80. Translated by George Heard 

Hamilton. 
apollinaire, guillaume. Chroniques d'Art (1902-1918), Paris, Gal- 

limard, 1960. Edited by L. B. Breunig. 
banham, reyner. Theory and Design in the First Machine Age, New 

York, Praeger, 1960, pp. 205-210, 248. 



barziin, henry martin. Orpheus: Modern Culture and the 1913 

Renaissance, New Rochelle, French Forum, 1960. Reprints of 

earlier articles and lectures. 
haftmann, werner. Painting in the Twentieth Century, New York, 

Praeger, 1960. 1st German edition, 1954-55, Munich, Prestel 

Verlag; English edition revised. 
rosenblum, Robert. Cubism and Twentieth Century Art, New York, 

Abrams, 1960. 
Rubin, William. Modern Sacred Art and the Church of Assy, New 

York, Columbia University Press, 1960, pp. 19, 29. 
Herbert, Eugenia w. The Artist and Social Reform, France and 

Belgium, 1885-1898, New Haven, Yale University Press, 1961. 
musee d'art moderne de la ville de PARIS, Catalogue-Guide, Paris, 

July, 1961. 
TAYLOR, JOSHUA c. Futurism., New York, The Museum of Modern Art, 

1961. 
Bergman, PAR. "Modernolatria" et " Simultaneita" '. Recherches sur 

deux tendances dans I' avant-garde litteraires en Italie et en 

France a la veille de la premiere guerre mondiale, Bonniers, 

Sweden, Studia Litterarum, Upsaliensia, 2, 1962. 
chevalier, jean. Albert Gleizes et la Cubisme, Basel, Basilius Press, 

1962. Foreword by R. Indlekofer. 
dorival, Bernard. The School of Paris in the Musee d'Art Moderne, 

New York, Abrams, 1962, pp. 12, 14, 23, 25, 31, 34, 46, 51, 138, 

148, 150, 156, 180, 262, 267, 290, 295. 
GRAY, Camilla. The Great Experiment: Russian Art, 1863-1922, New 

York, Abrams, 1962. 
maccarvill, eileen. Mainie Jellett, 1897-1944. A Retrospective Ex- 
hibition of Paintings and Drawings, Dublin, Municipal Gallery 

of Modern Art, July 26-October 7, 1962. 
menna, filiberto. Mondrian, Cultura e Poesia, Rome, Edizioni del- 

l'Ateneo, 1962, pp. 27, 30-32, 51, 96. 
cabanne, pierre. L' £popee du Cubisme, Paris, La Table Ronde, 1963. 

Extensive references. 
SERULLAZ, MAURICE. Le Cubisme, Paris, Presses Universitaires de 

France, 1963, pp. 82-85. 
tyler, PARKER. Florine Stettheimer: A Life in Art, New York, Farrar, 

Straus, 1963. 
meyer, FRANZ. Marc Chagall, New York, Abrams, 1964, pp. 111-115, 

177 ff. 



IVPl HI 1*111 II nVMSdlll'TK 



stalter, marcel andre. Le Fauconnier et L'Expressionisme, Paris, 
1961-62. Memoire principal presente pour le Diplome d'Etudes 
Superieures d'Historie de l'Art, sous la direction de M. Andre 
Chastel. 

gleizes, Juliette ROCHE. Memoirs, from 1912-53, written in the 
years 1959-63. 



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PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS All photographs but the following were made by Robert E. Mates and Paul Katz: 

AGRACI, Paris: no. 2 
Genevieve Allemand, Paris: no. 171 
Oliver Baker, New York: no. 40 
Henri Benezit, Paris: no. 73 
J. Camponogara, Lyon: no. 42 
Rene Deroudille, Lyon: nos. 79, 175 
J. W. Faulkner, Chicago: no. 131 
Giraudon, Paris: nos. 27, 28, 88, 124, 128, 153, 154 
Joseph Klima. Jr., Detroit: no. 30 
N. Mandel, Paris: no. 85 
Robert L. Ross, New York: nos. 170, 173 
Aimer;- Somogy, Paris : no. 23 
Studio Raissac Sete, Lunel: no. 100 
Strickland Studios, London: no. 41 
Taylor and Dull, New \ork: no. 82 

Marlborough Fine Art, Ltd., London: nos. 4, 7, 148, 150, 155, 179 
Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York: no. 21 
Gallery Andre Romanet, Paris : no. 109 
Josefowitz Collection, Genova: no. 33 
Albright- Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo: no. 45 
The Cincinnati Art Museum: no. 117 
Landesgalerie, Hannover: no. 35 
Wadsw-orth Atheneum, Hartford: no. 136 
The Trustees of The Tate Gallery, London : no. 123 
Musee des Beaux- Arts, Yille de Marseille: no. 132 
Rijksmuseum Kroller-Muller, Otterloo: no. 47 
Musee d'Art Moderne de la \ille de Paris: no. 31 
Musees Nationaux, Paris: nos. 71, 161 
Philadelphia Museum of Art : no. 62 
The Art Gallery of Toronto: no. 37 
Portrait of Albert Gleizes by Marcel Coen, Marseilles 
Albert Gleizes in his library by Photo Lido 



Exhibition 64/5 September-October 1964 

3000 copies of this catalogue, designed by Herbert Matter, 

have been printed by Joh. Enschede en Zonen, Haarlem, 

in September 1964 

for the Trustees of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 

on the occasion of the exhibition 

"Albert Gleizes" 



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